Apps of the Day: Sleipnir, Classic Notes Lite, and More

Every day we peruse the Android Market looking for the best, worst, interesting, and most unique apps in an effort to sift out a few gems. We call it Apps of the Day. We can’t guarantee that every app featured below is a real winner, but each is worth at least a quick look. It’s all in an effort to help you, our faithful readers, get the most out of your Android handsets. Read on to see what we found today!

Google Docs - Google Docs has been updated with support for 45 new languages. Also included is a new “Web Clipboard” feature that allows you to snap a photo with your Android handset and have it stored in the cloud for quick pasting into a Google Doc from your home computer. The updates don’t do much to create a deeper experience, and for the most part Google Docs still retains the feel of a slightly polished portal for the Google Docs website. Still, if you are a frequent user of Docs on the go, the Web Clipboard feature might be something to check out. [Market]

Classic Notes Lite - While most note taking applications focus on adding features upon features, often missing the point that at their core they should be easily accessible and easy to use, Classic Notes Lite + App Box manages to provide a minimalistic interface that doesn’t sacrifice quality. It’s really simple to open the app and jot down a note or list, but buried beneath a deceptively bland user interface is a whole mess of features and tools that create one extremely useful application. Aside from taking simple notes, Classic Notes Lite allows for calculations and conversions, geotagging, search, and phone use information all in one place. Download it to take some notes, but begin poking around and open up a world of uses. [Market]

Sleipnir Mobile Web Browser – OK, so you’re probably thinking, “we can’t possibly need another Android web broswer.” But here us out on this one. Sleipnir, though still in its beta phases, shows a lot of promise with a polished user interface and web surfing actions based around gestures. For instance, drawing a clockwise circle mimicking your standard browser’s refresh button quickly reloads the page. Tabs can be navigated with simple side-to-side swiping. While the finished product might not be totally there, the concept is. [Market]

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