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This photo of Charlie Rose was taken with a Project Glass prototype

Wondering if Project Glass is in a working state yet? At least one feature seems to be working out OK for Google in this ambitious venture. In an interview with Charlie Rose, Google engineer Sebastian Thrun took a photo of the subject with the pair of glasses.

Using nothing but gestures, the photo was taken and uploaded straight to Google+, promising functionality if I say so myself. Sure, the camera quality on this photo is pretty rank, but we have to remember that it’s only a prototype and the purpose here is to show and make sure that it works.

It seems to work fine, and when some higher quality sensors are brought into the project these glasses could make for some very useful photo-journeying. Head to the 30 second mark in the video at the source link for the Project Glass bit. [Google+, Charlie Rose video via The Verge]

Continue reading on the Google Glass forums, see the specs, or find news and reviews.




  • http://www.facebook.com/kam.w.siu Kam Siu

    wow, pretty neat. photo taking without hands

  • http://twitter.com/gamercore Chris Chavez

    Woah… Still better than I thought it would be. I’m just thinking of all the ways I can use this as a spycam O_o

  • http://www.facebook.com/kam.w.siu Kam Siu

    too bad there’s nothing in the exif to tell us anything more about the camera they’re using. it’s probably less than 1MP camera

    • Marsg

      No way i have an Ipad 2 that is under 1 mp and it looks way worse then this, with a camera like that it looks like your trying to take a photo in a dessert in the middle of a dust storm, that’s how grainy it looks, i would say 3 mp

      • http://techramen.tumblr.com/ Mike Gradijan

         I agree, maybe a 2 or 3 mp

  • WrinkledForeskin

    Dude, I’ll be standing under the mall escalator all day long :P

  • Protest Australia

    Yeeeeehawww

  • Matthew Dufrene

    better camera than the iPad2

    • AJA0

      But not the iPad 3..?

      • Matthew Dufrene

        I don’t know.  I’m not longer a iSheep

  • John Marion

    You cant be too critical of the quality of the image. Point and shoot or automatic exposure cameras/phones take the entire scene into account when basing the exposure. With all of the darkness the sensor was telling the exposure setting to lighten up. It always seeks 19% grey. Same as when you photograph a skier and the skier goes dark. Because of all the white, the sensor shuts it all down to make the snow 19% grey, but in the process the skier goes darker too. In this picture the opposite happened.  The sensor wants to bring all that black down to 19% grey so lightens the image. In the process the subject was lightened as well. Even the best point and shoot cameras would look the same. A good test would be in a scene without as much contrast.

  • jack kramer

    I can not wait til this come out, im gonna cheat on every test if get the chance to!!!

    • http://twitter.com/Alankrut Alankrut Patel

      5 years from now. 
      SAT prohibited items List:
      Cell Phone
      Mp3 Player
      Google Glass Set
      Laptop

      • Marsg

        Not bad I can totally graduate from college in that time  

      • jack kramer

        google needs to keep this quite and give it to its loyal android fan!

  • rustygh

    I do like this idea. However I’m not swaying from my must have better looking application. If they get this in a nice set of glasses it will be Bitchen! :)

    Haha somebody posted he would be at the escalator all day long. Teehee

  • Zenstrive

    Good enough for the instagram generation

  • leaponover

    Haha, people are berating the quality.  THe guy took a picture, from glasses on his face, with gestures….

    Gimmie a break!

  • KillerG

    Hmmm that’s actually not that bad of a photo for the proof of concept it is. I’d love to not have to worry about pulling out my phone to take a picture. 

  • http://blog.zevdesigns.com Zev

    It’s gonna need a wide angle lens to compete with the field of vision the wearer thinks he’s taking a picture of.