Samsung wireless charging cradle could hint at Galaxy S4 functionality

A recent FCC filing details a Samsung-made wireless charging station, the company’s first foray into a technology that is slowly but surely starting to catch on with manufacturers and consumers alike. The documentation of the Qi-compatible cradle provides plenty of details, including a plethora of images demonstrating the device.

In one image a Galaxy S3 is observed on the charging mat, a curious vision of what might have been. The GS3 was initially rumored to ship with wireless charging capabilities built into the phone, but the idea never came to fruition (unless you count third-party accessories). But the timing of the appearance of the Samsung-branded dock, which doesn’t seem sized to any particular device, should get people talking about the potential for wireless charging in the upcoming Galaxy S4.

Up until now, perhaps the most noteworthy Android device to ship with wireless charging out of the box was the Nexus 4 (the handset’s charging peripheral has not shipped yet, however). With awareness of the technology growing (and the chance to sell another $50+ accessory) it seems likely that Samsung will implement the feature in their highly-anticipated flagship phone.

Wireless charging would round out a set of specs that include could include multi-core Exynos processing, a 1080p Super AMOLED display, and 13MP camera. The cradle itself very well could go on to charge future Samsung releases from the G4 to the Galaxy Note 4.

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  • camelsnot

    sweet tap handle aka joystick aka yellow ball on a steeek.

  • Jim Shepherd

    Actually, The Nexus 4 wireless charging orb is now for sale at the Play Store ($59.99 in the US). Just noticed it for sale after looking at this article.

  • https://plus.google.com/108596272537415356460/posts Jason Farrell

    I’m not too interested in wireless charging for several reasons:
    1) I like to use my phone in-hand or in-stand WHILE it’s charging, so I need a cable anyway
    2) I like to use stands for my devices, instead of laying ‘em flat
    3) you have to line the phone up with the charger sweet spot for it to work (just like NFC’s sweet spot)
    4) energy inefficiency of inductive charging == wasteful
    5) $$.$$

    The only thing I like about it is lazy charging on the nightstand before bed, and the possibility that some future phones could be almost completely sealed & waterproof (‘cept for the speakers)

    • vioalas

      #3, I have a Lumia 920 (which I’m selling, I miss the apps, hahaha) and I don’t have to line it up, as long as it’s somewhat aligned it charges.

      • https://plus.google.com/108596272537415356460/posts Jason Farrell

        Guess it depends on the size and placement of the coils inside both the charger and phone, which reminds me of another wireless charging con: the inductive coils add a little bit of thickness (and sometimes doesn’t charge as well or at all inside a case)

        • AndroidiMac

          My Nexus 4 disagrees with you.

        • cody bratcher

          All coils for a standard cell phone are always the same size….That’s how inductive works in specs…the Receiver coil has to be of the same size of the Transmitter coil….
          This tech/design is over 100 years old!!!

    • phor11

      MicroUSB ports aren’t exactly the most sturdy design in the world. A small piece of lint inside the port when you try to plug it in and suddenly the fragile piece of plastic in the middle snaps off.

      The number one advantage for Wireless charging for me is that it removes the possibility of wear and tear from plugging/unplugging into a physical port.

    • Patrickl69

      1) You can just pick it up and put it right back when you’re done.
      2) There are stands with wireless charging built in
      3) You don’t have to line the device up to find the sweet spot. Either it centers automaitcally or the charger has multiple coils.
      4) WiFi is a whole lot more energy wasting than wireless charging. How much energy do you think goes into a battery? And then you only waste a fraction of that. This is such a bogus argument. Easy one, but bogus nonetheless.
      5) Convenience and less wear and tear on the fragile micro USB port.

    • cody bratcher

      A/C wall adapters waste a high percentage more then Inductive charging. One shuts down when battery is full other doesn’t. Even when A/C isn’t used, it’s still plugged in using energy…

      wireless charging you tend to drop phone of charger more and that saves more…look it up, new reports….Plus Why would Energy Star be on the Board Of Wireless Power group that Samsung heped Duracell Powermat start and Google VP, AT&T, FCC etc etc..

      Phone charging with cord and you have to be where it’s plugged in. Samsung’s Inductive tech they are pushing is called Spatial Freedom…Eventually charge while in pocket.

      Inductive chargers that sit up right , palm did it Qi have some out

      only Qi has to be Spot on, charger Pads that don’t are junk and have several copper Coils in it but neg feedback..

  • Steven Skwarkowski

    Include it for free with the S4 and Im sold. I wont be paying a HUGE premium for this charger otherwise

  • Jayshmay

    The accessories are grossly overpriced!!!

    But wireless charging would help with less wear on the micro-usb port!

    Maybe not the S4, but I can imagine this being included with smartphone at some point in the future.

    Eventually charging cables, will be non-existent!

  • Fr0stTr0n

    Are people really so farking lazy they don’t even wanna plug in a damn charging cable anymore?

    • enomele

      its not about being lazy. don’t be a tool, there are clear advantages to not using physical cables. breaking of the cable oR failure of the port. constantly plugging in different cables with different amp depending on where I am in the house can’t be good for it.

      • Fr0stTr0n

        It still requires a freaking cable in the end and its your own damn fault if you plug in the wrong cable

        • http://www.facebook.com/lucyparanormal Daniel Tiberius

          Play nice children.

        • cody bratcher

          you do know that cables have one way in, not like your car keys that can go in anyway you have it. and if the company that made that USB cable, if they didn’t pay fees to the USB group, they aren’t legally allowed to use the USB symbol which is how your fingers detect direction of a connector if possible.

    • cody bratcher

      That from someone who carries around a phone without wires or cords…..This is to grow to energy savings…Landfill having less batteries trash….save the one and only poet a Galaxy has…..Cell phones, making calls without wires benefits you more then other reasons…..so?

  • Quryous

    .

    WHAT? They are making this charger MODEL SPECIFIC?

    I think I’ll stick with the universal models offered by other companies. After all, it is just Qi and lots of companies make that, and once you buy ONE it will work on LOTS of devices, even ones not yet invented.

    Why be stuck with a device specific relic?

    In a few years EVERY phone will be wirelessly rechargeable, and just how many wireless chargers are you going to go through if they are all model specific. All THAT does is keep the prices not only HIGH, but repetitive.

    Looks like every unit manufacturer is already trying to see just how HIGH they can price these things, already.

    They are supposed to replace wired chargers, which currently can be had from $5.00USD up, with good ones starting for about $14.00. The OEM replacement for my Samsung BRANDED charger, including shipping off Amazon, is $14.95USD.

    .

  • http://www.facebook.com/lucyparanormal Daniel Tiberius

    Since it’s apparently going to be Qi compatible I’ll totally get one for my Note 2 and be able to use it on the Nexus charging dock thingy that just came out today.