Ice Cream = Google TV + Honeycomb + Gingerbread

When Android 3.0 was designed and launched specifically for tablets, the ugly voice of fragmentation screamed out from dissenters. We had a phone OS on Android 2.3/2.4 called Gingerbread, a tablet OS on Android 3.0 called Honeycomb, and a lot of confusion amongst the community. Eric Schmidt silenced much of that confusion at MWC in Barcelona, saying Ice Cream would merge Gingerbread and Honeycomb… but now we’re learning a great deal more.

Not only will Ice Cream merge Gingerbread and Honeycomb, but it will also merge Google TV into the AOSP (Android Open Source Project) Code Branch according to an article on GTV Source.com. We verified this with our tipster and signs point to “yes” at Google IO 2011.

In case you didn’t catch that… it’s huge news. In my humble opinion, Google TV is an ENORMOUS opportunity for an entire industry (television) to take the leap that it’s promised for decades (Internet TV). With the addition of apps and games from Android Market, I strongly believe Google TV will be a somewhat unstoppable force. We’ve known Google TV is based on Android and Chrome, but merging it into the AOSP branch means a lot of things, starting with Google’s supreme confidence and motivation in Google TV itself.

Google has been catching a ton of flack for not releasing the Honeycomb source code – it’s time to stop complaining. While everyone cries “fragmentation”, Google attempts to prevent the fragmentation, and then everyone cries “you’re not Open Source”! In my mind, Google has done a great job of balancing a project driven by Open Source concepts without losing control of Android’s momentum.

We reached out to one of our trusted tipsters regarding the [Icecream = Google TV + Honeycomb + Gingerbread] rumor and not only did they confirm it… they also provided some feedback of their own. According to this anonymous source, part of the reason Google is with-holding Honeycomb source code is BECAUSE of the planned integration with Google TV. If Google were to release the source code of Honeycomb now, then launch Ice Cream with Google TV integration, we’d be looking at the same problems and disparities between Gingerbread and Honeycomb all over again. Only this time the odd man out would be the newly added “TV” features.

What does the addition of Google TV to AOSP mean for consumers? A lot… but most of it is behind the scenes stuff. If phones, tablets, and TVs are all pulling from the same code that uses the same APIs, I see two immediately huge benefits:

  • Quicker updates. Google only has to update ONE code base which will account for phones, tablets and TVs. Fix it once or add a feature once and they’re golden across the board. This will allow Google to FOCUS on one “product” – the AOSP – with many different device types enjoying the benefit.
  • Easier/seamless integration between services running on different hardware since they’re based on the same code. Take for example the “Speech-to-text” operation on your Android Phone (I use it all the time). If Android OS and Google TV are not only using the same code for this, but it’s pulled from the same exact place, it maximizes consistency and greatly reduces the possibilities of headaches and compatibility problems.

While the above analysis could be considered a healthy mix of rumor and speculation, out tipster flat out told us that we can expect AOSP to merge Google TV, Honeycomb, and Gingerbread at Google IO. Of course timelines always change, as do plans, but this would be a HUGE step in the right direction for Google TV and open the door for Android Market on Google TV which we’ve been eagerly awaiting. Plus it all just makes sense.

I have no doubt that Google TV will eventually be HUGE. It’s a great concept on it’s own, but with the full momentum of Android behind it… I’m not sure it can lose. In my mind, the bigger question mark is Chrome and Chrome OS.

We’ve previously heard about HTML5 killing Apps and even Google CEO Eric Schmidt said most mobile apps will soon be written in HTML5. Chrome is Google’s insurance policy. They’ve got Android on the native mobile side and Chrome on the HTML side – they’ve got two leading horses in one of the most important races in all of technology. Chrome OS is more of an experiment in my mind, but testing the waters for how a atrictly HTML5-based, mobile-connected device can work. Once – and if – the shift from native apps to HTML5 takes place… Google will already have a huge head start.

Just as Google TV is merging into the Android source, I wouldn’t write off Chrome eventually being merged as well. Android has such a powerful brand name and following that people KNOW it and people WANT it. If Google launched anything as “the new Android XYZ” it would immediately grab consumer and critic attention. Although, as proven by the slow start of Google TV, it’s got to have the killer content to go along with it or we’ll hear it in one ear and out the other.

If you’re interested in GoogleTV hit up GTVsource.com, subscribe to their RSS, and join the Google TV Forum. If you’re a Chrome lover of all kinds (Browser, Extension, OS, Cr-48, etc…) visit our friends at ChromeSpot.com, subscribe to their RSS, and join the Chrome Forum.

PLEASE NOTE: this is regarding the AOSP (Android Open Source Project) and nothing consumers – or even developers – will notice cosmetically. It’s all ‘behind-the-scenes’ stuff… but important stuff that will certainly affect us all in the long run!

[Via GTVsource - thanks anonymous for verifying details!]

Continue reading:

TAGS:



  • Liams

    Did the source happen to estimate when Ice Cream will hit? It looks like Google know’s just what to do!

  • Liams

    Did the source happen to estimate when Ice Cream will hit? It looks like Google know’s just what to do!

    • Anonymous

      Hopefully in the summer, its hot in the summer.

    • Anonymous

      Hopefully in the summer, its hot in the summer.

    • Anonymous

      Hopefully in the summer, its hot in the summer.

    • Anonymous

      Hopefully in the summer, its hot in the summer.

    • Anonymous

      Hopefully in the summer, its hot in the summer.

    • Anonymous

      Hopefully in the summer, its hot in the summer.

      • http://profiles.google.com/omeara4pheonix William O’Meara

        lol

  • Liams

    Did the source happen to estimate when Ice Cream will hit? It looks like Google know’s just what to do!

  • Liams

    Did the source happen to estimate when Ice Cream will hit? It looks like Google know’s just what to do!

  • Liams

    Did the source happen to estimate when Ice Cream will hit? It looks like Google know’s just what to do!

  • Liams

    Did the source happen to estimate when Ice Cream will hit? It looks like Google know’s just what to do!

  • NovaeMeme

    Wowie wowers! I’m psyched. This is excellent news. (Hey, you might look into Motorola’s “Family Room” project and see if this is somehow linked.)

    I knew there was more to it when they decided not to release the Honeycomb source code for the time being and it seemed everyone was pissing and moaning and having general hissy fits about how Google is “closed” now.

    Android users can be so reactionary some times.

  • NovaeMeme

    Wowie wowers! I’m psyched. This is excellent news. (Hey, you might look into Motorola’s “Family Room” project and see if this is somehow linked.)

    I knew there was more to it when they decided not to release the Honeycomb source code for the time being and it seemed everyone was pissing and moaning and having general hissy fits about how Google is “closed” now.

    Android users can be so reactionary some times.

  • NovaeMeme

    Wowie wowers! I’m psyched. This is excellent news. (Hey, you might look into Motorola’s “Family Room” project and see if this is somehow linked.)

    I knew there was more to it when they decided not to release the Honeycomb source code for the time being and it seemed everyone was pissing and moaning and having general hissy fits about how Google is “closed” now.

    Android users can be so reactionary some times.

  • NovaeMeme

    Wowie wowers! I’m psyched. This is excellent news. (Hey, you might look into Motorola’s “Family Room” project and see if this is somehow linked.)

    I knew there was more to it when they decided not to release the Honeycomb source code for the time being and it seemed everyone was pissing and moaning and having general hissy fits about how Google is “closed” now.

    Android users can be so reactionary some times.

  • NovaeMeme

    Wowie wowers! I’m psyched. This is excellent news. (Hey, you might look into Motorola’s “Family Room” project and see if this is somehow linked.)

    I knew there was more to it when they decided not to release the Honeycomb source code for the time being and it seemed everyone was pissing and moaning and having general hissy fits about how Google is “closed” now.

    Android users can be so reactionary some times.

  • NovaeMeme

    Wowie wowers! I’m psyched. This is excellent news. (Hey, you might look into Motorola’s “Family Room” project and see if this is somehow linked.)

    I knew there was more to it when they decided not to release the Honeycomb source code for the time being and it seemed everyone was pissing and moaning and having general hissy fits about how Google is “closed” now.

    Android users can be so reactionary some times.

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      MB irrational a better word

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      MB irrational a better word

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      MB irrational a better word

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      MB irrational a better word

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      MB irrational a better word

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      MB irrational a better word

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=63212349 Daniel A Nieto

    Can’t wait, for all of it’s strengths android has never been as polished as iOS. This should not only put them on par with iOS in terms of performance but well beyond in terms of functionality… Now if only google could figure out how to cook DRM into the OS so when people buy an android device they don’t have to days of research to see if certain apps are going to work on their phone (looking at your Netflix)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=63212349 Daniel A Nieto

    Can’t wait, for all of it’s strengths android has never been as polished as iOS. This should not only put them on par with iOS in terms of performance but well beyond in terms of functionality… Now if only google could figure out how to cook DRM into the OS so when people buy an android device they don’t have to days of research to see if certain apps are going to work on their phone (looking at your Netflix)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=63212349 Daniel A Nieto

    Can’t wait, for all of it’s strengths android has never been as polished as iOS. This should not only put them on par with iOS in terms of performance but well beyond in terms of functionality… Now if only google could figure out how to cook DRM into the OS so when people buy an android device they don’t have to days of research to see if certain apps are going to work on their phone (looking at your Netflix)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=63212349 Daniel A Nieto

    Can’t wait, for all of it’s strengths android has never been as polished as iOS. This should not only put them on par with iOS in terms of performance but well beyond in terms of functionality… Now if only google could figure out how to cook DRM into the OS so when people buy an android device they don’t have to days of research to see if certain apps are going to work on their phone (looking at your Netflix)

  • frenzied reader

    and we gotta wait till google i/o for more info….>.> yeah that;s not gonna happen…the suspense will kill me

  • frenzied reader

    and we gotta wait till google i/o for more info….>.> yeah that;s not gonna happen…the suspense will kill me

  • frenzied reader

    and we gotta wait till google i/o for more info….>.> yeah that;s not gonna happen…the suspense will kill me

  • frenzied reader

    and we gotta wait till google i/o for more info….>.> yeah that;s not gonna happen…the suspense will kill me

  • frenzied reader

    and we gotta wait till google i/o for more info….>.> yeah that;s not gonna happen…the suspense will kill me

  • frenzied reader

    and we gotta wait till google i/o for more info….>.> yeah that;s not gonna happen…the suspense will kill me

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=63212349 Daniel A Nieto

    Can’t wait, for all of it’s strengths android has never been as polished as iOS. This should not only put them on par with iOS in terms of performance but well beyond in terms of functionality… Now if only google could figure out how to cook DRM into the OS so when people buy an android device they don’t have to days of research to see if certain apps are going to work on their phone (looking at your Netflix)

    • http://profiles.google.com/fahadayaz Fahad Ayaz

      Android 3.0 has DRM support. So if, as this article suggests, they’re all going to merge pretty soon, we should see it in the merged version of android! :)

    • http://profiles.google.com/fahadayaz Fahad Ayaz

      Android 3.0 has DRM support. So if, as this article suggests, they’re all going to merge pretty soon, we should see it in the merged version of android! :)

    • http://profiles.google.com/fahadayaz Fahad Ayaz

      Android 3.0 has DRM support. So if, as this article suggests, they’re all going to merge pretty soon, we should see it in the merged version of android! :)

      • Anonymous

        Also don’t forget that it was clearly stated that the Evo 3D will have DRM support build in. So I think we’re looking at all sorts of new functionality here soon.

      • Anonymous

        Also don’t forget that it was clearly stated that the Evo 3D will have DRM support build in. So I think we’re looking at all sorts of new functionality here soon.

      • Anonymous

        Also don’t forget that it was clearly stated that the Evo 3D will have DRM support build in. So I think we’re looking at all sorts of new functionality here soon.

      • Anonymous

        Also don’t forget that it was clearly stated that the Evo 3D will have DRM support build in. So I think we’re looking at all sorts of new functionality here soon.

      • Anonymous

        Also don’t forget that it was clearly stated that the Evo 3D will have DRM support build in. So I think we’re looking at all sorts of new functionality here soon.

      • Anonymous

        Also don’t forget that it was clearly stated that the Evo 3D will have DRM support build in. So I think we’re looking at all sorts of new functionality here soon.

    • http://profiles.google.com/fahadayaz Fahad Ayaz

      Android 3.0 has DRM support. So if, as this article suggests, they’re all going to merge pretty soon, we should see it in the merged version of android! :)

    • http://profiles.google.com/fahadayaz Fahad Ayaz

      Android 3.0 has DRM support. So if, as this article suggests, they’re all going to merge pretty soon, we should see it in the merged version of android! :)

    • http://profiles.google.com/fahadayaz Fahad Ayaz

      Android 3.0 has DRM support. So if, as this article suggests, they’re all going to merge pretty soon, we should see it in the merged version of android! :)

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=63212349 Daniel A Nieto

    Can’t wait, for all of it’s strengths android has never been as polished as iOS. This should not only put them on par with iOS in terms of performance but well beyond in terms of functionality… Now if only google could figure out how to cook DRM into the OS so when people buy an android device they don’t have to days of research to see if certain apps are going to work on their phone (looking at your Netflix)

  • Bela

    Currently I am not at all impressed with google tv. I hope they either vastly improve it, or at least don’t spend too much time cramming it into this build.

  • Bela

    Currently I am not at all impressed with google tv. I hope they either vastly improve it, or at least don’t spend too much time cramming it into this build.

  • Bela

    Currently I am not at all impressed with google tv. I hope they either vastly improve it, or at least don’t spend too much time cramming it into this build.

  • Bela

    Currently I am not at all impressed with google tv. I hope they either vastly improve it, or at least don’t spend too much time cramming it into this build.

  • Bela

    Currently I am not at all impressed with google tv. I hope they either vastly improve it, or at least don’t spend too much time cramming it into this build.

  • Bela

    Currently I am not at all impressed with google tv. I hope they either vastly improve it, or at least don’t spend too much time cramming it into this build.

  • Anonymous

    This is awesome news and the outcome will be remarkable next year.

  • Anonymous

    This is awesome news and the outcome will be remarkable next year.

  • Anonymous

    This is awesome news and the outcome will be remarkable next year.

  • Anonymous

    This is awesome news and the outcome will be remarkable next year.

  • Anonymous

    This is awesome news and the outcome will be remarkable next year.

  • Anonymous

    This is awesome news and the outcome will be remarkable next year.

  • catch

    I’ll definitely be happy when my Google TV actually does something fun…

  • catch

    I’ll definitely be happy when my Google TV actually does something fun…

  • catch

    I’ll definitely be happy when my Google TV actually does something fun…

  • catch

    I’ll definitely be happy when my Google TV actually does something fun…

  • catch

    I’ll definitely be happy when my Google TV actually does something fun…

  • catch

    I’ll definitely be happy when my Google TV actually does something fun…

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_K3MVOVHEK4AZY777NI5KWHGL5U David Jenkins

    Thanks for the article. Finally a common-sense reaction to Google’s more closed-minded approach on Android:

    While everyone cries “fragmentation”, Google attempts to prevent the fragmentation, and then everyone cries “you’re not Open Source”! In my mind, Google has done a great job of balancing a project driven by Open Source concepts without losing control of Android’s momentum.

    • Anonymous

      Yup, +1

    • Anonymous

      Yup, +1

    • Anonymous

      Yup, +1

    • Anonymous

      Yup, +1

    • Anonymous

      Yup, +1

    • Anonymous

      Yup, +1

    • drhill

      Android is open source. People just have no idea what that means. Everyone was up on arms about the “fragmentation fix” this morning, but Google isn’t preventing anyone from building android phones with their own customization.

      Motorola is more then welcome to make crappy Blur software. Google may choose not to allow said Blur (crappy) software to use Gmail, Google Voice, GTalk, Reader, and the Market. All of those apps are proprietary IP, and not “android”. They are closed source code. It is their right not to just give them away.

      As far as the BS hoopla about honeycomb source code. I like my Xoom (only had it two days), but I can tell it isn’t “finished” code. When it is done, Google will release the source code… but maybe it won’t be done until it is called IceCream. Only they know.

    • drhill

      Android is open source. People just have no idea what that means. Everyone was up on arms about the “fragmentation fix” this morning, but Google isn’t preventing anyone from building android phones with their own customization.

      Motorola is more then welcome to make crappy Blur software. Google may choose not to allow said Blur (crappy) software to use Gmail, Google Voice, GTalk, Reader, and the Market. All of those apps are proprietary IP, and not “android”. They are closed source code. It is their right not to just give them away.

      As far as the BS hoopla about honeycomb source code. I like my Xoom (only had it two days), but I can tell it isn’t “finished” code. When it is done, Google will release the source code… but maybe it won’t be done until it is called IceCream. Only they know.

    • drhill

      Android is open source. People just have no idea what that means. Everyone was up on arms about the “fragmentation fix” this morning, but Google isn’t preventing anyone from building android phones with their own customization.

      Motorola is more then welcome to make crappy Blur software. Google may choose not to allow said Blur (crappy) software to use Gmail, Google Voice, GTalk, Reader, and the Market. All of those apps are proprietary IP, and not “android”. They are closed source code. It is their right not to just give them away.

      As far as the BS hoopla about honeycomb source code. I like my Xoom (only had it two days), but I can tell it isn’t “finished” code. When it is done, Google will release the source code… but maybe it won’t be done until it is called IceCream. Only they know.

    • drhill

      Android is open source. People just have no idea what that means. Everyone was up on arms about the “fragmentation fix” this morning, but Google isn’t preventing anyone from building android phones with their own customization.

      Motorola is more then welcome to make crappy Blur software. Google may choose not to allow said Blur (crappy) software to use Gmail, Google Voice, GTalk, Reader, and the Market. All of those apps are proprietary IP, and not “android”. They are closed source code. It is their right not to just give them away.

      As far as the BS hoopla about honeycomb source code. I like my Xoom (only had it two days), but I can tell it isn’t “finished” code. When it is done, Google will release the source code… but maybe it won’t be done until it is called IceCream. Only they know.

    • drhill

      Android is open source. People just have no idea what that means. Everyone was up on arms about the “fragmentation fix” this morning, but Google isn’t preventing anyone from building android phones with their own customization.

      Motorola is more then welcome to make crappy Blur software. Google may choose not to allow said Blur (crappy) software to use Gmail, Google Voice, GTalk, Reader, and the Market. All of those apps are proprietary IP, and not “android”. They are closed source code. It is their right not to just give them away.

      As far as the BS hoopla about honeycomb source code. I like my Xoom (only had it two days), but I can tell it isn’t “finished” code. When it is done, Google will release the source code… but maybe it won’t be done until it is called IceCream. Only they know.

    • drhill

      Android is open source. People just have no idea what that means. Everyone was up on arms about the “fragmentation fix” this morning, but Google isn’t preventing anyone from building android phones with their own customization.

      Motorola is more then welcome to make crappy Blur software. Google may choose not to allow said Blur (crappy) software to use Gmail, Google Voice, GTalk, Reader, and the Market. All of those apps are proprietary IP, and not “android”. They are closed source code. It is their right not to just give them away.

      As far as the BS hoopla about honeycomb source code. I like my Xoom (only had it two days), but I can tell it isn’t “finished” code. When it is done, Google will release the source code… but maybe it won’t be done until it is called IceCream. Only they know.

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Henry-J-Lahman/100000848863316 Henry J. Lahman

        depends on what you mean by open source
        http://android.git.kernel.org/

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_K3MVOVHEK4AZY777NI5KWHGL5U David Jenkins

    Thanks for the article. Finally a common-sense reaction to Google’s more closed-minded approach on Android:

    While everyone cries “fragmentation”, Google attempts to prevent the fragmentation, and then everyone cries “you’re not Open Source”! In my mind, Google has done a great job of balancing a project driven by Open Source concepts without losing control of Android’s momentum.

  • Anonymous

    Holy crap. This is huge! Really wondering how ice cream itself will look, though. Speaking from experience, honeycomb reeeeeeeeeally doesn’t work on a phone.

  • Anonymous

    Holy crap. This is huge! Really wondering how ice cream itself will look, though. Speaking from experience, honeycomb reeeeeeeeeally doesn’t work on a phone.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_K3MVOVHEK4AZY777NI5KWHGL5U David Jenkins

    Thanks for the article. Finally a common-sense reaction to Google’s more closed-minded approach on Android:

    While everyone cries “fragmentation”, Google attempts to prevent the fragmentation, and then everyone cries “you’re not Open Source”! In my mind, Google has done a great job of balancing a project driven by Open Source concepts without losing control of Android’s momentum.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_K3MVOVHEK4AZY777NI5KWHGL5U David Jenkins

    Thanks for the article. Finally a common-sense reaction to Google’s more closed-minded approach on Android:

    While everyone cries “fragmentation”, Google attempts to prevent the fragmentation, and then everyone cries “you’re not Open Source”! In my mind, Google has done a great job of balancing a project driven by Open Source concepts without losing control of Android’s momentum.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_K3MVOVHEK4AZY777NI5KWHGL5U David Jenkins

    Thanks for the article. Finally a common-sense reaction to Google’s more closed-minded approach on Android:

    While everyone cries “fragmentation”, Google attempts to prevent the fragmentation, and then everyone cries “you’re not Open Source”! In my mind, Google has done a great job of balancing a project driven by Open Source concepts without losing control of Android’s momentum.

  • Anonymous

    Pretty psyched for I/O now. If we can get all three screens all running the same code, even if they have vastly different UIs, then we’ll be in business.

  • Anonymous

    Pretty psyched for I/O now. If we can get all three screens all running the same code, even if they have vastly different UIs, then we’ll be in business.

  • Anonymous

    Pretty psyched for I/O now. If we can get all three screens all running the same code, even if they have vastly different UIs, then we’ll be in business.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_K3MVOVHEK4AZY777NI5KWHGL5U David Jenkins

    Thanks for the article. Finally a common-sense reaction to Google’s more closed-minded approach on Android:

    While everyone cries “fragmentation”, Google attempts to prevent the fragmentation, and then everyone cries “you’re not Open Source”! In my mind, Google has done a great job of balancing a project driven by Open Source concepts without losing control of Android’s momentum.

  • Anonymous

    Pretty psyched for I/O now. If we can get all three screens all running the same code, even if they have vastly different UIs, then we’ll be in business.

  • Anonymous

    Holy crap. This is huge! Really wondering how ice cream itself will look, though. Speaking from experience, honeycomb reeeeeeeeeally doesn’t work on a phone.

  • Anonymous

    Pretty psyched for I/O now. If we can get all three screens all running the same code, even if they have vastly different UIs, then we’ll be in business.

  • Anonymous

    Pretty psyched for I/O now. If we can get all three screens all running the same code, even if they have vastly different UIs, then we’ll be in business.

  • Anonymous

    Holy crap. This is huge! Really wondering how ice cream itself will look, though. Speaking from experience, honeycomb reeeeeeeeeally doesn’t work on a phone.

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      Honeycomb isn’t suppose to run on a phone they will all be integrated when they get ice cream

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      Honeycomb isn’t suppose to run on a phone they will all be integrated when they get ice cream

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      Honeycomb isn’t suppose to run on a phone they will all be integrated when they get ice cream

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      Honeycomb isn’t suppose to run on a phone they will all be integrated when they get ice cream

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      Honeycomb isn’t suppose to run on a phone they will all be integrated when they get ice cream

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      Honeycomb isn’t suppose to run on a phone they will all be integrated when they get ice cream

    • http://profiles.google.com/zippobaker Zippo Baker

      As it goes, I believe Gingerbread will be the last mobile OS before the integration. Honeycomb was a public experiment to see how Android itself would work when scaled up for a larger, more powerful device. Whatever code is in Google tv devices is an experiment with how well Android can handle massive streams of media, as well as multitasking. Once the “beta” period is over, they will combine them into one powerful OS, and by the time the merge is complete smart phones will have enough juice to run it, and then some. Many phones are still hoping for FroYo, and the ones who were guaranteed it are still wishing for Gingerbread. Even at that, this year will bring us dual core phones, Sony’s NGP (PSP2) will have a quad core cpu and a quad core gpu, all under the sweet banner of Android. When IceCream hits, I believe Google’s next HOLY SH*T step will be the announcement of a full fledged phone/tv/tablet/pc OS that will be heftier and more stable, and obviously more versatile and powerful. That is the path that I think they will follow, whether directly or indirectly. Atleast, that’s what I want to happen. I know someday Google will be as hated as Microsoft, but until then I want Android on my damn PC!

  • Anonymous

    Holy crap. This is huge! Really wondering how ice cream itself will look, though. Speaking from experience, honeycomb reeeeeeeeeally doesn’t work on a phone.

  • Anonymous

    Holy crap. This is huge! Really wondering how ice cream itself will look, though. Speaking from experience, honeycomb reeeeeeeeeally doesn’t work on a phone.

  • Honeycomb_FTW

    I’ve always wondered why Google TV wasn’t built into Android. To me this all makes sense. . . now they just need to kill Chrome OS and integrate the positives of it into Android then they might actually be focused.

    • drhill

      It is built into Android. They branched off of 2.1 code and they just haven’t merged that code back into the AOSP public branch. Only the companies with GoogleTV products would have access to the current code.

    • drhill

      It is built into Android. They branched off of 2.1 code and they just haven’t merged that code back into the AOSP public branch. Only the companies with GoogleTV products would have access to the current code.

    • drhill

      It is built into Android. They branched off of 2.1 code and they just haven’t merged that code back into the AOSP public branch. Only the companies with GoogleTV products would have access to the current code.

    • drhill

      It is built into Android. They branched off of 2.1 code and they just haven’t merged that code back into the AOSP public branch. Only the companies with GoogleTV products would have access to the current code.

    • drhill

      It is built into Android. They branched off of 2.1 code and they just haven’t merged that code back into the AOSP public branch. Only the companies with GoogleTV products would have access to the current code.

    • drhill

      It is built into Android. They branched off of 2.1 code and they just haven’t merged that code back into the AOSP public branch. Only the companies with GoogleTV products would have access to the current code.

  • Honeycomb_FTW

    I’ve always wondered why Google TV wasn’t built into Android. To me this all makes sense. . . now they just need to kill Chrome OS and integrate the positives of it into Android then they might actually be focused.

  • Honeycomb_FTW

    I’ve always wondered why Google TV wasn’t built into Android. To me this all makes sense. . . now they just need to kill Chrome OS and integrate the positives of it into Android then they might actually be focused.

  • Honeycomb_FTW

    I’ve always wondered why Google TV wasn’t built into Android. To me this all makes sense. . . now they just need to kill Chrome OS and integrate the positives of it into Android then they might actually be focused.

  • Honeycomb_FTW

    I’ve always wondered why Google TV wasn’t built into Android. To me this all makes sense. . . now they just need to kill Chrome OS and integrate the positives of it into Android then they might actually be focused.

  • Honeycomb_FTW

    I’ve always wondered why Google TV wasn’t built into Android. To me this all makes sense. . . now they just need to kill Chrome OS and integrate the positives of it into Android then they might actually be focused.

  • Anonymous

    I fear that for people buying 2.2 phones in the next few months, Ice Cream will come very very late.

  • Anonymous

    I fear that for people buying 2.2 phones in the next few months, Ice Cream will come very very late.

    • http://twitter.com/leleuxart Brian Leleux

      I wouldn’t be surprised if any of the non-dual-core devices don’t get Ice Cream, let alone Gingerbread. The last list I saw for Gingy updates were just mostly rumors I think. Here’s to hoping that the X at least gets Gingerbread…

    • http://twitter.com/leleuxart Brian Leleux

      I wouldn’t be surprised if any of the non-dual-core devices don’t get Ice Cream, let alone Gingerbread. The last list I saw for Gingy updates were just mostly rumors I think. Here’s to hoping that the X at least gets Gingerbread…

    • http://twitter.com/leleuxart Brian Leleux

      I wouldn’t be surprised if any of the non-dual-core devices don’t get Ice Cream, let alone Gingerbread. The last list I saw for Gingy updates were just mostly rumors I think. Here’s to hoping that the X at least gets Gingerbread…

    • http://twitter.com/leleuxart Brian Leleux

      I wouldn’t be surprised if any of the non-dual-core devices don’t get Ice Cream, let alone Gingerbread. The last list I saw for Gingy updates were just mostly rumors I think. Here’s to hoping that the X at least gets Gingerbread…

    • http://twitter.com/leleuxart Brian Leleux

      I wouldn’t be surprised if any of the non-dual-core devices don’t get Ice Cream, let alone Gingerbread. The last list I saw for Gingy updates were just mostly rumors I think. Here’s to hoping that the X at least gets Gingerbread…

  • Anonymous

    I fear that for people buying 2.2 phones in the next few months, Ice Cream will come very very late.

  • Anonymous

    I fear that for people buying 2.2 phones in the next few months, Ice Cream will come very very late.

  • Anonymous

    I fear that for people buying 2.2 phones in the next few months, Ice Cream will come very very late.

  • Anonymous

    I fear that for people buying 2.2 phones in the next few months, Ice Cream will come very very late.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jason-Mull/503534137 Jason Mull

    Hmm, I understand the excitement but I wouldn’t even call this a rumor. It’s fact.

    When Google TV was announced (at Google I/O 2010), it was said that it would get the Market in early 2011 and be open sourced. We know that the first Android Compatibility Definition Document (CDD) that would allow for the Market to be on an HDTV-type device was 2.3 Gingerbread as it didn’t require phone-specific features like the Dialer. Gingerbread also added support for x-large screen sizes () The later applies to both tablets and HDTV’s (things with HD resolutions).

    What we didn’t know at the time was how tablets would fit into the equation, but now we do. Honeycomb is tablet-only and phone-support/AOSP drop would happen with Ice Cream, the next version of Android. Also, expect the SDK add-on with Google TV extensions to be available prior to Google I/O on May 10th 11th.

    We’ll know (a lot) more soon!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jason-Mull/503534137 Jason Mull

    Hmm, I understand the excitement but I wouldn’t even call this a rumor. It’s fact.

    When Google TV was announced (at Google I/O 2010), it was said that it would get the Market in early 2011 and be open sourced. We know that the first Android Compatibility Definition Document (CDD) that would allow for the Market to be on an HDTV-type device was 2.3 Gingerbread as it didn’t require phone-specific features like the Dialer. Gingerbread also added support for x-large screen sizes () The later applies to both tablets and HDTV’s (things with HD resolutions).

    What we didn’t know at the time was how tablets would fit into the equation, but now we do. Honeycomb is tablet-only and phone-support/AOSP drop would happen with Ice Cream, the next version of Android. Also, expect the SDK add-on with Google TV extensions to be available prior to Google I/O on May 10th 11th.

    We’ll know (a lot) more soon!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jason-Mull/503534137 Jason Mull

    Hmm, I understand the excitement but I wouldn’t even call this a rumor. It’s fact.

    When Google TV was announced (at Google I/O 2010), it was said that it would get the Market in early 2011 and be open sourced. We know that the first Android Compatibility Definition Document (CDD) that would allow for the Market to be on an HDTV-type device was 2.3 Gingerbread as it didn’t require phone-specific features like the Dialer. Gingerbread also added support for x-large screen sizes () The later applies to both tablets and HDTV’s (things with HD resolutions).

    What we didn’t know at the time was how tablets would fit into the equation, but now we do. Honeycomb is tablet-only and phone-support/AOSP drop would happen with Ice Cream, the next version of Android. Also, expect the SDK add-on with Google TV extensions to be available prior to Google I/O on May 10th 11th.

    We’ll know (a lot) more soon!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jason-Mull/503534137 Jason Mull

    Hmm, I understand the excitement but I wouldn’t even call this a rumor. It’s fact.

    When Google TV was announced (at Google I/O 2010), it was said that it would get the Market in early 2011 and be open sourced. We know that the first Android Compatibility Definition Document (CDD) that would allow for the Market to be on an HDTV-type device was 2.3 Gingerbread as it didn’t require phone-specific features like the Dialer. Gingerbread also added support for x-large screen sizes () The later applies to both tablets and HDTV’s (things with HD resolutions).

    What we didn’t know at the time was how tablets would fit into the equation, but now we do. Honeycomb is tablet-only and phone-support/AOSP drop would happen with Ice Cream, the next version of Android. Also, expect the SDK add-on with Google TV extensions to be available prior to Google I/O on May 10th 11th.

    We’ll know (a lot) more soon!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jason-Mull/503534137 Jason Mull

    Hmm, I understand the excitement but I wouldn’t even call this a rumor. It’s fact.

    When Google TV was announced (at Google I/O 2010), it was said that it would get the Market in early 2011 and be open sourced. We know that the first Android Compatibility Definition Document (CDD) that would allow for the Market to be on an HDTV-type device was 2.3 Gingerbread as it didn’t require phone-specific features like the Dialer. Gingerbread also added support for x-large screen sizes () The later applies to both tablets and HDTV’s (things with HD resolutions).

    What we didn’t know at the time was how tablets would fit into the equation, but now we do. Honeycomb is tablet-only and phone-support/AOSP drop would happen with Ice Cream, the next version of Android. Also, expect the SDK add-on with Google TV extensions to be available prior to Google I/O on May 10th 11th.

    We’ll know (a lot) more soon!

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Jason-Mull/503534137 Jason Mull

    Hmm, I understand the excitement but I wouldn’t even call this a rumor. It’s fact.

    When Google TV was announced (at Google I/O 2010), it was said that it would get the Market in early 2011 and be open sourced. We know that the first Android Compatibility Definition Document (CDD) that would allow for the Market to be on an HDTV-type device was 2.3 Gingerbread as it didn’t require phone-specific features like the Dialer. Gingerbread also added support for x-large screen sizes () The later applies to both tablets and HDTV’s (things with HD resolutions).

    What we didn’t know at the time was how tablets would fit into the equation, but now we do. Honeycomb is tablet-only and phone-support/AOSP drop would happen with Ice Cream, the next version of Android. Also, expect the SDK add-on with Google TV extensions to be available prior to Google I/O on May 10th 11th.

    We’ll know (a lot) more soon!

  • http://twitter.com/dangroveruk Dan Grover

    It will somewhat destroy the idea of having “vanilla” android though. I mean, there might be “vanilla phone” android, “vanilla tablet” android etc, but if everything works with everything, the lines blurr a bit anyway. Why not grab the notifications system from one and the launcher from the other, etc? You could have a big variety of different “flavours” of Android offering slightly different experiences, all of which are entirely AOSP compliant, so… yeah, vanilla is no more?

    Not that I care about this, but some people might.

  • http://twitter.com/dangroveruk Dan Grover

    It will somewhat destroy the idea of having “vanilla” android though. I mean, there might be “vanilla phone” android, “vanilla tablet” android etc, but if everything works with everything, the lines blurr a bit anyway. Why not grab the notifications system from one and the launcher from the other, etc? You could have a big variety of different “flavours” of Android offering slightly different experiences, all of which are entirely AOSP compliant, so… yeah, vanilla is no more?

    Not that I care about this, but some people might.

  • http://twitter.com/dangroveruk Dan Grover

    It will somewhat destroy the idea of having “vanilla” android though. I mean, there might be “vanilla phone” android, “vanilla tablet” android etc, but if everything works with everything, the lines blurr a bit anyway. Why not grab the notifications system from one and the launcher from the other, etc? You could have a big variety of different “flavours” of Android offering slightly different experiences, all of which are entirely AOSP compliant, so… yeah, vanilla is no more?

    Not that I care about this, but some people might.

  • http://twitter.com/dangroveruk Dan Grover

    It will somewhat destroy the idea of having “vanilla” android though. I mean, there might be “vanilla phone” android, “vanilla tablet” android etc, but if everything works with everything, the lines blurr a bit anyway. Why not grab the notifications system from one and the launcher from the other, etc? You could have a big variety of different “flavours” of Android offering slightly different experiences, all of which are entirely AOSP compliant, so… yeah, vanilla is no more?

    Not that I care about this, but some people might.

  • http://twitter.com/dangroveruk Dan Grover

    It will somewhat destroy the idea of having “vanilla” android though. I mean, there might be “vanilla phone” android, “vanilla tablet” android etc, but if everything works with everything, the lines blurr a bit anyway. Why not grab the notifications system from one and the launcher from the other, etc? You could have a big variety of different “flavours” of Android offering slightly different experiences, all of which are entirely AOSP compliant, so… yeah, vanilla is no more?

    Not that I care about this, but some people might.

  • http://twitter.com/dangroveruk Dan Grover

    It will somewhat destroy the idea of having “vanilla” android though. I mean, there might be “vanilla phone” android, “vanilla tablet” android etc, but if everything works with everything, the lines blurr a bit anyway. Why not grab the notifications system from one and the launcher from the other, etc? You could have a big variety of different “flavours” of Android offering slightly different experiences, all of which are entirely AOSP compliant, so… yeah, vanilla is no more?

    Not that I care about this, but some people might.

  • http://profiles.google.com/dossa002 Andrew Dos Santos

    The fragmentation vs open source arugment really isn’t a matter of Android users just being indecisive and not being happy with either answer. It’s mostly just a divide between the users. As a proponent for the open source option, fragmentation doesn’t really bother me. Some people might not care or mind if there phone never gets updated beyond Cupcake, but some find the updates to be a necessity. That’s why I prefer the open source option. If you buy a phone from an OEM that has a history of not updating (Samsung, Motorola, etc.) and the updates are a complete necessity for you, then go with an OEM who does have a good record of updating. *cough*HTC*cough*

    Otherwise, if you’re a rooted end-user like many of us here, than the open-srouce model is probably best as it’s what opens up the software to developers to make their own custom ROMs and port them from other devices.

  • http://profiles.google.com/dossa002 Andrew Dos Santos

    The fragmentation vs open source arugment really isn’t a matter of Android users just being indecisive and not being happy with either answer. It’s mostly just a divide between the users. As a proponent for the open source option, fragmentation doesn’t really bother me. Some people might not care or mind if there phone never gets updated beyond Cupcake, but some find the updates to be a necessity. That’s why I prefer the open source option. If you buy a phone from an OEM that has a history of not updating (Samsung, Motorola, etc.) and the updates are a complete necessity for you, then go with an OEM who does have a good record of updating. *cough*HTC*cough*

    Otherwise, if you’re a rooted end-user like many of us here, than the open-srouce model is probably best as it’s what opens up the software to developers to make their own custom ROMs and port them from other devices.

  • http://profiles.google.com/dossa002 Andrew Dos Santos

    The fragmentation vs open source arugment really isn’t a matter of Android users just being indecisive and not being happy with either answer. It’s mostly just a divide between the users. As a proponent for the open source option, fragmentation doesn’t really bother me. Some people might not care or mind if there phone never gets updated beyond Cupcake, but some find the updates to be a necessity. That’s why I prefer the open source option. If you buy a phone from an OEM that has a history of not updating (Samsung, Motorola, etc.) and the updates are a complete necessity for you, then go with an OEM who does have a good record of updating. *cough*HTC*cough*

    Otherwise, if you’re a rooted end-user like many of us here, than the open-srouce model is probably best as it’s what opens up the software to developers to make their own custom ROMs and port them from other devices.

  • http://profiles.google.com/dossa002 Andrew Dos Santos

    The fragmentation vs open source arugment really isn’t a matter of Android users just being indecisive and not being happy with either answer. It’s mostly just a divide between the users. As a proponent for the open source option, fragmentation doesn’t really bother me. Some people might not care or mind if there phone never gets updated beyond Cupcake, but some find the updates to be a necessity. That’s why I prefer the open source option. If you buy a phone from an OEM that has a history of not updating (Samsung, Motorola, etc.) and the updates are a complete necessity for you, then go with an OEM who does have a good record of updating. *cough*HTC*cough*

    Otherwise, if you’re a rooted end-user like many of us here, than the open-srouce model is probably best as it’s what opens up the software to developers to make their own custom ROMs and port them from other devices.

  • http://profiles.google.com/dossa002 Andrew Dos Santos

    The fragmentation vs open source arugment really isn’t a matter of Android users just being indecisive and not being happy with either answer. It’s mostly just a divide between the users. As a proponent for the open source option, fragmentation doesn’t really bother me. Some people might not care or mind if there phone never gets updated beyond Cupcake, but some find the updates to be a necessity. That’s why I prefer the open source option. If you buy a phone from an OEM that has a history of not updating (Samsung, Motorola, etc.) and the updates are a complete necessity for you, then go with an OEM who does have a good record of updating. *cough*HTC*cough*

    Otherwise, if you’re a rooted end-user like many of us here, than the open-srouce model is probably best as it’s what opens up the software to developers to make their own custom ROMs and port them from other devices.

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      Moto updates there phones buddy

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      Moto updates there phones buddy

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      Moto updates there phones buddy

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      Moto updates there phones buddy

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      Moto updates there phones buddy

    • http://twitter.com/binglut9 Brian

      Moto updates there phones buddy

      • Anonymous

        Not as much as they should? Motorola definitely isn’t Htc that’s for sure.

      • Anonymous

        Not as much as they should? Motorola definitely isn’t Htc that’s for sure.

      • http://profiles.google.com/zippobaker Zippo Baker

        Do they? Where is 2.3 for my Droid X? I’m fairly certain it will come, but last word was that it had been cancelled for the time being. Motorola quit giving a damn some time ago, on all fronts. Even the radios I use at work aren’t what they used to be, so I don’t exactly expect much from them (Moto) after release day on a product.

    • http://twitter.com/leleuxart Brian Leleux

      But aren’t the carrier’s just as responsible with updates as the phone manufacturers are? I’m not entirely sure of the update process(Google > Manufacturer> Carrier… or however it goes), but I think the carriers still get to play with the update before it is pushed to the consumers. I know that when I got Froyo, it came with a few new apps that I didn’t necessarily want(Madden?!), would those be the manufacturer or the carrier’s doing?

      • http://www.facebook.com/people/Henry-J-Lahman/100000848863316 Henry J. Lahman

        yeah something like that.
        and to answer your question yes.

      • http://profiles.google.com/omeara4pheonix William O’Meara

        yes just as the galaxy s phones had the update to 2.2 over a year ago but it took till november for it to be released for the epic and it was the first us galaxy s to get the update

    • http://twitter.com/leleuxart Brian Leleux

      But aren’t the carrier’s just as responsible with updates as the phone manufacturers are? I’m not entirely sure of the update process(Google > Manufacturer> Carrier… or however it goes), but I think the carriers still get to play with the update before it is pushed to the consumers. I know that when I got Froyo, it came with a few new apps that I didn’t necessarily want(Madden?!), would those be the manufacturer or the carrier’s doing?

    • http://twitter.com/leleuxart Brian Leleux

      But aren’t the carrier’s just as responsible with updates as the phone manufacturers are? I’m not entirely sure of the update process(Google > Manufacturer> Carrier… or however it goes), but I think the carriers still get to play with the update before it is pushed to the consumers. I know that when I got Froyo, it came with a few new apps that I didn’t necessarily want(Madden?!), would those be the manufacturer or the carrier’s doing?

    • http://twitter.com/leleuxart Brian Leleux

      But aren’t the carrier’s just as responsible with updates as the phone manufacturers are? I’m not entirely sure of the update process(Google > Manufacturer> Carrier… or however it goes), but I think the carriers still get to play with the update before it is pushed to the consumers. I know that when I got Froyo, it came with a few new apps that I didn’t necessarily want(Madden?!), would those be the manufacturer or the carrier’s doing?

    • http://twitter.com/leleuxart Brian Leleux

      But aren’t the carrier’s just as responsible with updates as the phone manufacturers are? I’m not entirely sure of the update process(Google > Manufacturer> Carrier… or however it goes), but I think the carriers still get to play with the update before it is pushed to the consumers. I know that when I got Froyo, it came with a few new apps that I didn’t necessarily want(Madden?!), would those be the manufacturer or the carrier’s doing?

    • joey

      actually moto get updates out pretty fast bro. htc was faster with just one phone. my wife had 2.2 on her d2 and i was still on 2.1 with my dinc. i assume you won a evo.

    • joey

      actually moto get updates out pretty fast bro. htc was faster with just one phone. my wife had 2.2 on her d2 and i was still on 2.1 with my dinc. i assume you won a evo.

    • joey

      actually moto get updates out pretty fast bro. htc was faster with just one phone. my wife had 2.2 on her d2 and i was still on 2.1 with my dinc. i assume you won a evo.

    • joey

      actually moto get updates out pretty fast bro. htc was faster with just one phone. my wife had 2.2 on her d2 and i was still on 2.1 with my dinc. i assume you won a evo.

    • joey

      actually moto get updates out pretty fast bro. htc was faster with just one phone. my wife had 2.2 on her d2 and i was still on 2.1 with my dinc. i assume you won a evo.

  • http://profiles.google.com/dossa002 Andrew Dos Santos

    The fragmentation vs open source arugment really isn’t a matter of Android users just being indecisive and not being happy with either answer. It’s mostly just a divide between the users. As a proponent for the open source option, fragmentation doesn’t really bother me. Some people might not care or mind if there phone never gets updated beyond Cupcake, but some find the updates to be a necessity. That’s why I prefer the open source option. If you buy a phone from an OEM that has a history of not updating (Samsung, Motorola, etc.) and the updates are a complete necessity for you, then go with an OEM who does have a good record of updating. *cough*HTC*cough*

    Otherwise, if you’re a rooted end-user like many of us here, than the open-srouce model is probably best as it’s what opens up the software to developers to make their own custom ROMs and port them from other devices.

  • Anonymous

    When do you think ice cream will be released?

  • Anonymous

    When do you think ice cream will be released?

  • Anonymous

    When do you think ice cream will be released?

  • Anonymous

    When do you think ice cream will be released?

  • Anonymous

    When do you think ice cream will be released?

  • Anonymous

    When do you think ice cream will be released?

  • Ray

    So this is pretty awesome. Creating a code that will be used on both Android phones and Google TV would be a huge advantage. The apps would all be really similar and they would streamline things a lot. I work for Dish Network and I have a Logitech Revue with Google TV and I really can’t wait for more apps on it. I really love using Pandora and Netflix. Thanks for the updated information!

  • Ray

    So this is pretty awesome. Creating a code that will be used on both Android phones and Google TV would be a huge advantage. The apps would all be really similar and they would streamline things a lot. I work for Dish Network and I have a Logitech Revue with Google TV and I really can’t wait for more apps on it. I really love using Pandora and Netflix. Thanks for the updated information!

  • Ray

    So this is pretty awesome. Creating a code that will be used on both Android phones and Google TV would be a huge advantage. The apps would all be really similar and they would streamline things a lot. I work for Dish Network and I have a Logitech Revue with Google TV and I really can’t wait for more apps on it. I really love using Pandora and Netflix. Thanks for the updated information!

  • Ray

    So this is pretty awesome. Creating a code that will be used on both Android phones and Google TV would be a huge advantage. The apps would all be really similar and they would streamline things a lot. I work for Dish Network and I have a Logitech Revue with Google TV and I really can’t wait for more apps on it. I really love using Pandora and Netflix. Thanks for the updated information!

  • Ray

    So this is pretty awesome. Creating a code that will be used on both Android phones and Google TV would be a huge advantage. The apps would all be really similar and they would streamline things a lot. I work for Dish Network and I have a Logitech Revue with Google TV and I really can’t wait for more apps on it. I really love using Pandora and Netflix. Thanks for the updated information!

  • X3haloed

    ENORMOUS BECAUSE ONE FOCUS HUGE HUGE KNOW WANT

    Phew, this article is VERY INTESNSE

  • X3haloed

    ENORMOUS BECAUSE ONE FOCUS HUGE HUGE KNOW WANT

    Phew, this article is VERY INTESNSE

  • X3haloed

    ENORMOUS BECAUSE ONE FOCUS HUGE HUGE KNOW WANT

    Phew, this article is VERY INTESNSE

  • X3haloed

    ENORMOUS BECAUSE ONE FOCUS HUGE HUGE KNOW WANT

    Phew, this article is VERY INTESNSE

  • X3haloed

    ENORMOUS BECAUSE ONE FOCUS HUGE HUGE KNOW WANT

    Phew, this article is VERY INTESNSE

  • Anonymous

    I wonder, with Android now controlling the largest share of mobile devices, will adding GoogleTV give Google better bargaining deals with online content providers who currently block googletv?

  • Anonymous

    I wonder, with Android now controlling the largest share of mobile devices, will adding GoogleTV give Google better bargaining deals with online content providers who currently block googletv?

  • Anonymous

    I wonder, with Android now controlling the largest share of mobile devices, will adding GoogleTV give Google better bargaining deals with online content providers who currently block googletv?

  • Anonymous

    I wonder, with Android now controlling the largest share of mobile devices, will adding GoogleTV give Google better bargaining deals with online content providers who currently block googletv?

  • Anonymous

    I wonder, with Android now controlling the largest share of mobile devices, will adding GoogleTV give Google better bargaining deals with online content providers who currently block googletv?

  • Pcman1911

    You will never see icecream if you own a Samsung phone

  • Pcman1911

    You will never see icecream if you own a Samsung phone

  • Pcman1911

    You will never see icecream if you own a Samsung phone

  • Pcman1911

    You will never see icecream if you own a Samsung phone

  • Pcman1911

    You will never see icecream if you own a Samsung phone

    • Anonymous

      Technically the Nexus S is a Samsung phone…

    • Anonymous

      Technically the Nexus S is a Samsung phone…

      • wrenchy

        Samsung manufacture’s the Nexus S according to Google’s spec, but it’s not a “Samsung” phone.

        That’s like calling the iPhone a Foxconn Phone.

      • wrenchy

        Samsung manufacture’s the Nexus S according to Google’s spec, but it’s not a “Samsung” phone.

        That’s like calling the iPhone a Foxconn Phone.

      • wrenchy

        Samsung manufacture’s the Nexus S according to Google’s spec, but it’s not a “Samsung” phone.

        That’s like calling the iPhone a Foxconn Phone.

      • wrenchy

        Samsung manufacture’s the Nexus S according to Google’s spec, but it’s not a “Samsung” phone.

        That’s like calling the iPhone a Foxconn Phone.

      • wrenchy

        Samsung manufacture’s the Nexus S according to Google’s spec, but it’s not a “Samsung” phone.

        That’s like calling the iPhone a Foxconn Phone.

      • wrenchy

        Samsung manufacture’s the Nexus S according to Google’s spec, but it’s not a “Samsung” phone.

        That’s like calling the iPhone a Foxconn Phone.

        • Anonymous

          Nexus S is a Samsung phone and that’s that. How do you think Samsung got their Galaxy S2 on 2.3.3 so fast? It’s because the phone software is very similar. And if you look VERY closely it does say Samsung on the Nexus S wich you don’t see on the iPhone.

        • Anonymous

          Nexus S is a Samsung phone and that’s that. How do you think Samsung got their Galaxy S2 on 2.3.3 so fast? It’s because the phone software is very similar. And if you look VERY closely it does say Samsung on the Nexus S wich you don’t see on the iPhone.

        • Anonymous

          Nexus S is a Samsung phone and that’s that. How do you think Samsung got their Galaxy S2 on 2.3.3 so fast? It’s because the phone software is very similar. And if you look VERY closely it does say Samsung on the Nexus S wich you don’t see on the iPhone.

        • Anonymous

          Nexus S is a Samsung phone and that’s that. How do you think Samsung got their Galaxy S2 on 2.3.3 so fast? It’s because the phone software is very similar. And if you look VERY closely it does say Samsung on the Nexus S wich you don’t see on the iPhone.

        • Anonymous

          Nexus S is a Samsung phone and that’s that. How do you think Samsung got their Galaxy S2 on 2.3.3 so fast? It’s because the phone software is very similar. And if you look VERY closely it does say Samsung on the Nexus S wich you don’t see on the iPhone.

        • Anonymous

          Nexus S is a Samsung phone and that’s that. How do you think Samsung got their Galaxy S2 on 2.3.3 so fast? It’s because the phone software is very similar. And if you look VERY closely it does say Samsung on the Nexus S wich you don’t see on the iPhone.

        • Anonymous

          Nexus S is a Samsung phone and that’s that. How do you think Samsung got their Galaxy S2 on 2.3.3 so fast? It’s because the phone software is very similar. And if you look VERY closely it does say Samsung on the Nexus S wich you don’t see on the iPhone.

          • http://www.facebook.com/people/Henry-J-Lahman/100000848863316 Henry J. Lahman

            Why would iPhone say Samsung?
            oh you meant foxconn…
            it does (under that cosmetic iWrapper)

        • Anonymous

          Nexus S is a Samsung phone and that’s that. How do you think Samsung got their Galaxy S2 on 2.3.3 so fast? It’s because the phone software is very similar. And if you look VERY closely it does say Samsung on the Nexus S wich you don’t see on the iPhone.

        • Anonymous

          Nexus S is a Samsung phone and that’s that. How do you think Samsung got their Galaxy S2 on 2.3.3 so fast? It’s because the phone software is very similar. And if you look VERY closely it does say Samsung on the Nexus S wich you don’t see on the iPhone.

        • Anonymous

          Nexus S is a Samsung phone and that’s that. How do you think Samsung got their Galaxy S2 on 2.3.3 so fast? It’s because the phone software is very similar. And if you look VERY closely it does say Samsung on the Nexus S wich you don’t see on the iPhone.

        • Anonymous

          Nexus S is a Samsung phone and that’s that. How do you think Samsung got their Galaxy S2 on 2.3.3 so fast? It’s because the phone software is very similar. And if you look VERY closely it does say Samsung on the Nexus S wich you don’t see on the iPhone.

        • Anonymous

          Nexus S is a Samsung phone and that’s that. How do you think Samsung got their Galaxy S2 on 2.3.3 so fast? It’s because the phone software is very similar. And if you look VERY closely it does say Samsung on the Nexus S wich you don’t see on the iPhone.

        • Anonymous

          Nexus S is a Samsung phone and that’s that. How do you think Samsung got their Galaxy S2 on 2.3.3 so fast? It’s because the phone software is very similar. And if you look VERY closely it does say Samsung on the Nexus S wich you don’t see on the iPhone.

      • wrenchy

        Samsung manufacture’s the Nexus S according to Google’s spec, but it’s not a “Samsung” phone.

        That’s like calling the iPhone a Foxconn Phone.

      • wrenchy

        Samsung manufacture’s the Nexus S according to Google’s spec, but it’s not a “Samsung” phone.

        That’s like calling the iPhone a Foxconn Phone.

      • wrenchy

        Samsung manufacture’s the Nexus S according to Google’s spec, but it’s not a “Samsung” phone.

        That’s like calling the iPhone a Foxconn Phone.

      • wrenchy

        Samsung manufacture’s the Nexus S according to Google’s spec, but it’s not a “Samsung” phone.

        That’s like calling the iPhone a Foxconn Phone.

      • wrenchy

        Samsung manufacture’s the Nexus S according to Google’s spec, but it’s not a “Samsung” phone.

        That’s like calling the iPhone a Foxconn Phone.

      • wrenchy

        Samsung manufacture’s the Nexus S according to Google’s spec, but it’s not a “Samsung” phone.

        That’s like calling the iPhone a Foxconn Phone.

    • Anonymous

      Technically the Nexus S is a Samsung phone…

    • Anonymous

      Technically the Nexus S is a Samsung phone…

    • Anonymous

      Technically the Nexus S is a Samsung phone…

    • Anonymous

      Technically the Nexus S is a Samsung phone…

    • Anonymous

      you are saying stupid stuff… Nexus S is a Samsung phone that will get Ice Cream first before all phones. If you are referring to Galaxy S devices in USA not being updated, please turn to your trusty Carrier that is blocking the updates. Samsung had 2.2 on EUro phones in October 2010 I think. And soon the EUro galaxy S will get 2.3.3 soon, since it already leaked a few times almost completed.

    • Anonymous

      you are saying stupid stuff… Nexus S is a Samsung phone that will get Ice Cream first before all phones. If you are referring to Galaxy S devices in USA not being updated, please turn to your trusty Carrier that is blocking the updates. Samsung had 2.2 on EUro phones in October 2010 I think. And soon the EUro galaxy S will get 2.3.3 soon, since it already leaked a few times almost completed.

    • Anonymous

      you are saying stupid stuff… Nexus S is a Samsung phone that will get Ice Cream first before all phones. If you are referring to Galaxy S devices in USA not being updated, please turn to your trusty Carrier that is blocking the updates. Samsung had 2.2 on EUro phones in October 2010 I think. And soon the EUro galaxy S will get 2.3.3 soon, since it already leaked a few times almost completed.

    • Anonymous

      you are saying stupid stuff… Nexus S is a Samsung phone that will get Ice Cream first before all phones. If you are referring to Galaxy S devices in USA not being updated, please turn to your trusty Carrier that is blocking the updates. Samsung had 2.2 on EUro phones in October 2010 I think. And soon the EUro galaxy S will get 2.3.3 soon, since it already leaked a few times almost completed.

    • Anonymous

      you are saying stupid stuff… Nexus S is a Samsung phone that will get Ice Cream first before all phones. If you are referring to Galaxy S devices in USA not being updated, please turn to your trusty Carrier that is blocking the updates. Samsung had 2.2 on EUro phones in October 2010 I think. And soon the EUro galaxy S will get 2.3.3 soon, since it already leaked a few times almost completed.

    • Anonymous

      you are saying stupid stuff… Nexus S is a Samsung phone that will get Ice Cream first before all phones. If you are referring to Galaxy S devices in USA not being updated, please turn to your trusty Carrier that is blocking the updates. Samsung had 2.2 on EUro phones in October 2010 I think. And soon the EUro galaxy S will get 2.3.3 soon, since it already leaked a few times almost completed.

      • http://profiles.google.com/omeara4pheonix William O’Meara

        plus you can always download the international version of the firmware and install it on your us device i did that for my friends captivate cause he was jealous that i had 2.2 on my epic

        • Death259

          Except you can’t… that works on a captivate because the i9000 is just an international captivate so the hardware is as close to identical as you can get. This makes it so the drivers are the same and thus you can just put an i9000 rom or version of android on a captivate. This isn’t possible with an Epic 4g.

    • Anonymous

      you are saying stupid stuff… Nexus S is a Samsung phone that will get Ice Cream first before all phones. If you are referring to Galaxy S devices in USA not being updated, please turn to your trusty Carrier that is blocking the updates. Samsung had 2.2 on EUro phones in October 2010 I think. And soon the EUro galaxy S will get 2.3.3 soon, since it already leaked a few times almost completed.

    • Anonymous

      you are saying stupid stuff… Nexus S is a Samsung phone that will get Ice Cream first before all phones. If you are referring to Galaxy S devices in USA not being updated, please turn to your trusty Carrier that is blocking the updates. Samsung had 2.2 on EUro phones in October 2010 I think. And soon the EUro galaxy S will get 2.3.3 soon, since it already leaked a few times almost completed.

    • Anonymous

      you are saying stupid stuff… Nexus S is a Samsung phone that will get Ice Cream first before all phones. If you are referring to Galaxy S devices in USA not being updated, please turn to your trusty Carrier that is blocking the updates. Samsung had 2.2 on EUro phones in October 2010 I think. And soon the EUro galaxy S will get 2.3.3 soon, since it already leaked a few times almost completed.

    • Anonymous

      you are saying stupid stuff… Nexus S is a Samsung phone that will get Ice Cream first before all phones. If you are referring to Galaxy S devices in USA not being updated, please turn to your trusty Carrier that is blocking the updates. Samsung had 2.2 on EUro phones in October 2010 I think. And soon the EUro galaxy S will get 2.3.3 soon, since it already leaked a few times almost completed.

    • Anonymous

      you are saying stupid stuff… Nexus S is a Samsung phone that will get Ice Cream first before all phones. If you are referring to Galaxy S devices in USA not being updated, please turn to your trusty Carrier that is blocking the updates. Samsung had 2.2 on EUro phones in October 2010 I think. And soon the EUro galaxy S will get 2.3.3 soon, since it already leaked a few times almost completed.

    • Anonymous

      you are saying stupid stuff… Nexus S is a Samsung phone that will get Ice Cream first before all phones. If you are referring to Galaxy S devices in USA not being updated, please turn to your trusty Carrier that is blocking the updates. Samsung had 2.2 on EUro phones in October 2010 I think. And soon the EUro galaxy S will get 2.3.3 soon, since it already leaked a few times almost completed.

    • Anonymous

      you are saying stupid stuff… Nexus S is a Samsung phone that will get Ice Cream first before all phones. If you are referring to Galaxy S devices in USA not being updated, please turn to your trusty Carrier that is blocking the updates. Samsung had 2.2 on EUro phones in October 2010 I think. And soon the EUro galaxy S will get 2.3.3 soon, since it already leaked a few times almost completed.

  • Faxx

    Fuck yaaaaaaaaaaaa

  • Faxx

    Fuck yaaaaaaaaaaaa

  • Faxx

    Fuck yaaaaaaaaaaaa

  • Faxx

    Fuck yaaaaaaaaaaaa

  • Faxx

    Fuck yaaaaaaaaaaaa

  • Faxx

    Fuck yaaaaaaaaaaaa

  • Faxx

    If this is some April Fools joke im gnna be fucking furious.

    • Paul

      oh my…. i’d forgotten about Google’s tendency to April Fool’s participation… i agree. this would be “over the line”

    • Paul

      oh my…. i’d forgotten about Google’s tendency to April Fool’s participation… i agree. this would be “over the line”

    • Paul

      oh my…. i’d forgotten about Google’s tendency to April Fool’s participation… i agree. this would be “over the line”

    • Paul

      oh my…. i’d forgotten about Google’s tendency to April Fool’s participation… i agree. this would be “over the line”

    • Paul

      oh my…. i’d forgotten about Google’s tendency to April Fool’s participation… i agree. this would be “over the line”

    • Paul

      oh my…. i’d forgotten about Google’s tendency to April Fool’s participation… i agree. this would be “over the line”

  • Faxx

    If this is some April Fools joke im gnna be fucking furious.

  • Faxx

    If this is some April Fools joke im gnna be fucking furious.

  • Faxx

    If this is an April fools joke im going to be furious.

  • Faxx

    If this is an April fools joke im going to be furious.

  • Faxx

    If this is an April fools joke im going to be furious.

  • Faxx

    If this is an April fools joke im going to be furious.

  • Faxx

    If this is an April fools joke im going to be furious.

  • Faxx

    If this is an April fools joke im going to be furious.

  • Zasifre

    This are all unimportant changes for end users and developers.

    The real important question is if GPU hardware acceleration is finally coming to phones? This is the biggest Android flaw.

  • Zasifre

    This are all unimportant changes for end users and developers.

    The real important question is if GPU hardware acceleration is finally coming to phones? This is the biggest Android flaw.

    • sets

      Agreed. It’s fricking BEYOND a bad joke that nearly every Android phone has a decent GPU inside being utterly wasted, while the CPU struggels to render tings smoothly

    • sets

      Agreed. It’s fricking BEYOND a bad joke that nearly every Android phone has a decent GPU inside being utterly wasted, while the CPU struggels to render tings smoothly

    • sets

      Agreed. It’s fricking BEYOND a bad joke that nearly every Android phone has a decent GPU inside being utterly wasted, while the CPU struggels to render tings smoothly

  • Zasifre

    This are all unimportant changes for end users and developers.

    The real important question is if GPU hardware acceleration is finally coming to phones? This is the biggest Android flaw.

  • Zasifre

    This are all unimportant changes for end users and developers.

    The real important question is if GPU hardware acceleration is finally coming to phones? This is the biggest Android flaw.

  • Zasifre

    This are all unimportant changes for end users and developers.

    The real important question is if GPU hardware acceleration is finally coming to phones? This is the biggest Android flaw.

  • Zasifre

    This are all unimportant changes for end users and developers.

    The real important question is if GPU hardware acceleration is finally coming to phones? This is the biggest Android flaw.

  • Anonymous

    Not really sure if this is relevant, but I have to say I really like the Amazon Appstore > Android Market. Its really clean, uncluttered and simple to use. Not that the Android Market isn’t, but right now its like Android 1.6 whereas Amazon Appstore is like Gingerbread 2.3.

    And BTW, just my opinion.

  • Anonymous

    Not really sure if this is relevant, but I have to say I really like the Amazon Appstore > Android Market. Its really clean, uncluttered and simple to use. Not that the Android Market isn’t, but right now its like Android 1.6 whereas Amazon Appstore is like Gingerbread 2.3.

    And BTW, just my opinion.

  • Anonymous

    Not really sure if this is relevant, but I have to say I really like the Amazon Appstore > Android Market. Its really clean, uncluttered and simple to use. Not that the Android Market isn’t, but right now its like Android 1.6 whereas Amazon Appstore is like Gingerbread 2.3.

    And BTW, just my opinion.

  • Anonymous

    Not really sure if this is relevant, but I have to say I really like the Amazon Appstore > Android Market. Its really clean, uncluttered and simple to use. Not that the Android Market isn’t, but right now its like Android 1.6 whereas Amazon Appstore is like Gingerbread 2.3.

    And BTW, just my opinion.

  • Anonymous

    Not really sure if this is relevant, but I have to say I really like the Amazon Appstore > Android Market. Its really clean, uncluttered and simple to use. Not that the Android Market isn’t, but right now its like Android 1.6 whereas Amazon Appstore is like Gingerbread 2.3.

    And BTW, just my opinion.

  • Anonymous

    Not really sure if this is relevant, but I have to say I really like the Amazon Appstore > Android Market. Its really clean, uncluttered and simple to use. Not that the Android Market isn’t, but right now its like Android 1.6 whereas Amazon Appstore is like Gingerbread 2.3.

    And BTW, just my opinion.

  • Gogol

    Ehm … April fool … anyone?

    This is too good to be true … unless it is not April fool !!!! :)

  • Gogol

    Ehm … April fool … anyone?

    This is too good to be true … unless it is not April fool !!!! :)

  • Gogol

    Ehm … April fool … anyone?

    This is too good to be true … unless it is not April fool !!!! :)

  • Gogol

    Ehm … April fool … anyone?

    This is too good to be true … unless it is not April fool !!!! :)

  • Gogol

    Ehm … April fool … anyone?

    This is too good to be true … unless it is not April fool !!!! :)

  • Gogol

    Ehm … April fool … anyone?

    This is too good to be true … unless it is not April fool !!!! :)

  • Anonymous

    does this mean som variant of GTV available on my phone/tablet? because that would be sweet.

  • Anonymous

    does this mean som variant of GTV available on my phone/tablet? because that would be sweet.

  • Anonymous

    Not so much concerned about Google TV right now as I am a cloud music service. My crap is everywhere, I want some organization. Google TV will be great in the future but definitely should not trump a cloud music service.

  • Anonymous

    Not so much concerned about Google TV right now as I am a cloud music service. My crap is everywhere, I want some organization. Google TV will be great in the future but definitely should not trump a cloud music service.

  • Regu7

    I ♥ my iPhone 4

  • Regu7

    I ♥ my iPhone 4

  • Regu7

    I ♥ my iPhone 4

  • Regu7

    I ♥ my iPhone 4

  • Regu7

    I ♥ my iPhone 4

  • Regu7

    I ♥ my iPhone 4

  • Regu7

    I ♥ my iPhone 4

  • Regu7

    I ♥ my iPhone 4

  • Regu7

    I ♥ my iPhone 4

    • http://profiles.google.com/zippobaker Zippo Baker

      Looks like you hit the wrong button some where…..Android is the topic here, If i missed something someone correct me.

  • Regu7

    I ♥ my iPhone 4

  • Sorja Balaski

    I want to make a quick point. If any merger between Android and Chrome OS, the brand name will be Chrome OS and not Android. The Chrome browser is 12% of World’s browsers. Android is 1% of that. Chrome is better known as a brand than Android.

  • Sorja Balaski

    I want to make a quick point. If any merger between Android and Chrome OS, the brand name will be Chrome OS and not Android. The Chrome browser is 12% of World’s browsers. Android is 1% of that. Chrome is better known as a brand than Android.

  • Sorja Balaski

    I want to make a quick point. If any merger between Android and Chrome OS, the brand name will be Chrome OS and not Android. The Chrome browser is 12% of World’s browsers. Android is 1% of that. Chrome is better known as a brand than Android.

  • Sorja Balaski

    I want to make a quick point. If any merger between Android and Chrome OS, the brand name will be Chrome OS and not Android. The Chrome browser is 12% of World’s browsers. Android is 1% of that. Chrome is better known as a brand than Android.

  • Sorja Balaski

    I want to make a quick point. If any merger between Android and Chrome OS, the brand name will be Chrome OS and not Android. The Chrome browser is 12% of World’s browsers. Android is 1% of that. Chrome is better known as a brand than Android.

  • Sorja Balaski

    I want to make a quick point. If any merger between Android and Chrome OS, the brand name will be Chrome OS and not Android. The Chrome browser is 12% of World’s browsers. Android is 1% of that. Chrome is better known as a brand than Android.

  • Sorja Balaski

    I want to make a quick point. If any merger between Android and Chrome OS, the brand name will be Chrome OS and not Android. The Chrome browser is 12% of World’s browsers. Android is 1% of that. Chrome is better known as a brand than Android.

  • Sorja Balaski

    I want to make a quick point. If any merger between Android and Chrome OS, the brand name will be Chrome OS and not Android. The Chrome browser is 12% of World’s browsers. Android is 1% of that. Chrome is better known as a brand than Android.

  • Sorja Balaski

    I want to make a quick point. If any merger between Android and Chrome OS, the brand name will be Chrome OS and not Android. The Chrome browser is 12% of World’s browsers. Android is 1% of that. Chrome is better known as a brand than Android.

  • Sorja Balaski

    I want to make a quick point. If any merger between Android and Chrome OS, the brand name will be Chrome OS and not Android. The Chrome browser is 12% of World’s browsers. Android is 1% of that. Chrome is better known as a brand than Android.

  • Sorja Balaski

    I want to make a quick point. If any merger between Android and Chrome OS, the brand name will be Chrome OS and not Android. The Chrome browser is 12% of World’s browsers. Android is 1% of that. Chrome is better known as a brand than Android.

  • Sorja Balaski

    I want to make a quick point. If any merger between Android and Chrome OS, the brand name will be Chrome OS and not Android. The Chrome browser is 12% of World’s browsers. Android is 1% of that. Chrome is better known as a brand than Android.

  • Sorja Balaski

    I want to make a quick point. If any merger between Android and Chrome OS, the brand name will be Chrome OS and not Android. The Chrome browser is 12% of World’s browsers. Android is 1% of that. Chrome is better known as a brand than Android.

    • http://twitter.com/TrioSims Trio Sims

      Android currently holds 33% of the smart phone market, by the way.

    • http://twitter.com/TrioSims Trio Sims

      Android currently holds 33% of the smart phone market, by the way.

    • http://twitter.com/TrioSims Trio Sims

      Android currently holds 33% of the smart phone market, by the way.

    • http://twitter.com/TrioSims Trio Sims

      Android currently holds 33% of the smart phone market, by the way.

    • http://twitter.com/TrioSims Trio Sims

      Android currently holds 33% of the smart phone market, by the way.

    • http://twitter.com/TrioSims Trio Sims

      Android currently holds 33% of the smart phone market, by the way.

    • http://twitter.com/TrioSims Trio Sims

      Android currently holds 33% of the smart phone market, by the way.

    • http://twitter.com/TrioSims Trio Sims

      Android currently holds 33% of the smart phone market, by the way.

    • http://twitter.com/TrioSims Trio Sims

      Android currently holds 33% of the smart phone market, by the way.

    • http://twitter.com/TrioSims Trio Sims

      Android currently holds 33% of the smart phone market, by the way.

    • http://profiles.google.com/zippobaker Zippo Baker

      Where the hell do you get your market statistics? Wikipedia? The amount of people who own Android phones is actually higher than those who use Chrome (OS or browser). The average person uses some form of I.E. or Firefox. Chrome OS hasnt even taken off, why would they change the name of a titan like Android in a merger to match the weaker product? That makes no sense economically. It would be like Ford changing their name to Volvo. Two good brands, but they would have alienated half their customers, if not more. Chrome is a damn good browser, but it has lagged behind just a bit. Android market share is about 3 times greater, 12% vs 33%. Please use Google next time (heh) before you state any kind of statistic. At least then you will have a source to blame when your wrong.

      • MtnDew

        I’m hoping that one day “browser” on Android will be replaced by “chrome”

    • http://www.androidpolice.com/author/eric-ravenscraft/ Eric Ravenscraft

      Yeah, but the little green robot is cuter.

  • King of the Sea

    I don’t want Google on my TV. Google services = yes – Google watching me like a freaky big brother – no thanks ^.^

  • bogus2112

    Use your smart phone as a media machine and stream Google TV to your TV while using your smart phone as a remote. Instant win!