Dec, 20 2012

Samsung has been the biggest player in the mobile space when it comes to pushing the flexible display movement forward, and while it’s nothing new — we’ve seen flexible displays come in 4.5 inch and other flavors before — Samsung could be looking to go even bigger and bringing their latest achievements along to CES. CNET has learned Samsung would be bringing a flexible variant of its 5.5 inch AMOLED display to the Vegas trade show this January.

For Samsung, flexible displays will bring the trait in function as well as in engineering freedom. They’ll give Samsung more options when it comes to building its phones. This particular screen size is identical to that of the Samsung Galaxy Note 2’s. While it might be easy to guess where Samsung might want to go with that, we can’t make too many assumptions. Still, we imagine the OEM will be looking to ready this display for an eventual third installment in the Samsung Galaxy Note line.

The display would still have  the same 1280×720 resolution of Samsung’s current Super AMOLED HD panels. It’d be nice to see some of these panels outfitted with 1080p resolution at some point, but 267 ppi is still nothing to sneeze at in this day and age. Samsung has spent a lot of time and money in research and development trying to perfect this technology.

It’s hard to keep getting excited for it without seeing how it can contribute to the overall design of a smartphone, but we’re hopeful Samsung isn’t spending all this time and money for no reason. In fact, Samsung has been rumored to be implementing a flexible, unbreakable display in the Samsung Galaxy S4 due early next year.

While it’s not certain that the S4 will enjoy the same screen size being discussed here it’s indication that Samsung could indeed have something ready to go. We’ll see just how far along they are come CES, but for now just know that the train is moving on this flexible display stuff and it feels like we’re awfully close to seeing this in Samsung’s hottest devices.

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