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ASUS: Transformer’s Ice Cream Sandwich Update Being Approved by Google

ASUS originally promised an “early February” window for the Ice Cream Sandwich upgrade for their original Eee Pad Transformer and it looks like they are on track to meet it. The company said on Facebook that the upgrade is currently in the process of being approved by Google meaning quality assurance and testing is all wrapped up on ASUS’s end. Of course, anything could cause Google to reject the upgrade but we have a feeling things will be good to go by the time the shortest month of the year arrives. [ASUS via Droid-Life]

Continue reading on the ASUS Eee Pad Transformer forums, see the specs, or find news and reviews.




  • Chepa

    About freaking time!

  • bytewise

    Can’t wait! 

  • http://twitter.com/yomama84 yomama84

    How cheap could I get a transformer for?  Because I’m tired of waiting on being able to buy a prime.

  • Aeires

    Can’t wait, my daily checks will finally come to an end.

    Let the Asus 7″ tablet wait begin!

    • iThinkThere4iAm

      Forget that noise – Get this update on my Samsung Galaxy Note after it comes to my Transformer, now that would be cool. No…more like SUPERcool baby! Where’s Dick Vitale when you need him baby?

  • Will Herrick

    This doesn’t make sense to me. Why is Google involved in this at all? Unless someone can explain why Asus would need Google’s approval of the ICS build I’m calling bullshit on this.

    • Sonelone

      It needs Google approval to have Google apps(Market, Gmail, Maps, etc.) This was put is place by Google on ICS devices to make sure they have a consistent UI, unlike previous versions of Android.

      • petersinnott

        You have always needed Google approval to have Google apps.

      • Will Herrick

        I was always under the impression that Google’s approval to include GApps was a contractual thing and not one that needs first hand verification that the terms of the contract had been met. 

        I’ve NEVER seen “We’re waiting for Google’s approval of the firmware” as an excuse for when a new release will be ready, and rightfully so — it doesn’t make sense and is a waste of time. 

        Has this hurdle only been put in place with ICS? I haven’t seen anything like this and I read Android sites constantly.

        • ThreeFourSeven

          You also have to remember, All ICS devices has to have to holo theme if it wants access to the android market. So most manufacturers have to redesign their skin. They can’t change the menu to look like their skin anymore.

      • http://profiles.google.com/hackbod Dianne Hackborn

        “This was put is place by Google on ICS devices to make sure they have a consistent UI, unlike previous versions of Android.”

        No, this is not true at all.

        The Android Compatibility Definition has been part of Android since 1.0.  It is the requirements a device needs to meet in order to have the Android Market ship on it.  This is how there is a guarantee of compatibility for applications across devices running Android.  (That is, Android is open source, so any changes can be made to it; the CDD specifies the changes that are allowed while still being compatible and thus able to run Market and the apps on it.)

        Part of the CDD is the Compatibility Test Suite.  The CTS is a large set of tests that manufacturers must run on their device which check that it is behaving as it should.  These results and sent to Google if you want to ship with Market, and any issues with the tests must be resolved.

        The Android 4.0 CTS contains a new set of tests that make sure that the Holo theme looks the same as the base platform.  That is the new thing in 4.0 that doesn’t allow manufacturers to skin the holo theme.  It is automated, it doesn’t require anyone from Google examining a device by hand.

        You can read lots more about Android compatibility here: http://source.android.com/compatibility/index.html

      • http://profiles.google.com/hackbod Dianne Hackborn

        “This was put is place by Google on ICS devices to make sure they have a consistent UI, unlike previous versions of Android.”

        No, this is not true at all.

        The Android Compatibility Definition has been part of Android since 1.0.  It is the requirements a device needs to meet in order to have the Android Market ship on it.  This is how there is a guarantee of compatibility for applications across devices running Android.  (That is, Android is open source, so any changes can be made to it; the CDD specifies the changes that are allowed while still being compatible and thus able to run Market and the apps on it.)

        Part of the CDD is the Compatibility Test Suite.  The CTS is a large set of tests that manufacturers must run on their device which check that it is behaving as it should.  These results and sent to Google if you want to ship with Market, and any issues with the tests must be resolved.

        The Android 4.0 CTS contains a new set of tests that make sure that the Holo theme looks the same as the base platform.  That is the new thing in 4.0 that doesn’t allow manufacturers to skin the holo theme.  It is automated, it doesn’t require anyone from Google examining a device by hand.

        You can read lots more about Android compatibility here: http://source.android.com/compatibility/index.html

  • Jody Schoolcraft

    Hope it doesn’t cause “certain” Transformers to reboot & lock up like it did for the Prime….I am Primeless now because of the ICS upgrade.

  • alexafterbuffalo

    This is just another reason I’m glad I opted to buya TF rather than dropping $100+ on a different tablet.

    • bobdude5

      every time i look at my galaxy tab i think why did i buy this instead of the transformer.  Then i realize i got it for free lol

  • YamiYaiba

    So, what I’m gathering from this is that Google has put up some waist-high walks in the garden of Android, in an effort to prevent fragmentation…err…”differentiation.” Skinning is theoretically dead, much to my personal dismay. I’m a long time Sense fan, back in the days when it was TouchFLO on Windows Mobile. But that aside, Google appears to have made strategic move to curb an over perceived issue that mostly plagues mid and low tier devices among the non-tech savvy crowd, when in reality that crowd likely isn’t aware that their “droid” runs an operating system no different from a computer and can be updated. Fragmentation is an issue for developers, to be sure, but not for users. Those of us savvy enough to want it can root and get it.

  • YamiYaiba

    So, what I’m gathering from this is that Google has put up some waist-high walks in the garden of Android, in an effort to prevent fragmentation…err…”differentiation.” Skinning is theoretically dead, much to my personal dismay. I’m a long time Sense fan, back in the days when it was TouchFLO on Windows Mobile. But that aside, Google appears to have made strategic move to curb an over perceived issue that mostly plagues mid and low tier devices among the non-tech savvy crowd, when in reality that crowd likely isn’t aware that their “droid” runs an operating system no different from a computer and can be updated. Fragmentation is an issue for developers, to be sure, but not for users. Those of us savvy enough to want it can root and get it.

    • http://twitter.com/mibikin Mario Feghali

      You do realize the original transformer is stock Honeycomb, with the only difference being the white soft buttons, right? It will probably be the same for ICS I would assume.

  • Paul McKenna

    Don’t worry, folks, we’re still waaaay ahead of the other Android tablet users!  And Flash is ready for it as well, so, it won’t be long now…

  • lolobabes

    I hope other oems are reading this…