Apr, 27 2010

I’ve come to look forward to these metrics reports: we get a very interesting (and arguably accurate) look at how Android is faring not only within its own ecosystem, but the entire mobile phone space as a whole. AdMob just released their mobile metrics report for March 2010 and there’s some pretty cool data to be had.

The biggest thing that stood out to me, first of all, was the fact that 11 different Android devices made up nearly all of the Android traffic in March. In contrast, only two devices – the HTC Dream and HTC Magic – made up the same 96% 11 months ago. Obviously, the selection of devices since 2009 has significantly changed, and it’s good to see other handsets catching their own break (I can only assume that the Motorola Droid is amongst the biggest factor in this equation, which the report confirms as it made up of 32% of worldwide Android traffic).

android-os-version-share-admob-march2010

We also got a look at traffic by platform version. The numbers are similar to what Google showed in their market access statistics a couple weeks ago, with Android 1.5 devices matching at 38% exactly. As for Android 1.6, it saw a traffic share of 26%, while 2.0 and 2.1 devices made up for a collective 35%.

admob-march-2010-operating-system-share-worldwide

Overall, Android’s traffic continues to grow at an alarming rate of 32% per month. At this same time last year, AdMob recorded 72 million requests for the month, while March 2010 showed a huge jump to 2 billion. The big statistic everyone wants to hear about – overall Android marketshare – remains pretty stagnant since February 2010. Android saw a 1% increase, but it’s interesting to note that the iPhone OS suffered a 4% decrease, as well.

admob-march-2010-operating-system-share-united-states

One stat I wanted to point out was Android’s marketshare in the United States, specifically. AdMob shows that Android requests surpassed that of the iPhone’s – showing a share of 46% compared to iPhone OS’s 39%. As we always point out, these numbers may not be indicative of true marketshare, but it’s still pretty interesting, nonetheless. What do you guys think about these numbers? Is Android growing as fast as you thought it would?

[via AdMob]