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Buy Windows 7: For Nostalgia & Sanity

windows-7If you have Windows Vista, you’ve probably wanted to gouge your eyes out with a titanium spatula dipped in scorching hot snake venom. Or maybe not. But either way I want to inform you that today is the first day you can officially Buy Windows 7.

Why the HECK am I telling you to buy Windows 7 on a freaking ANDROID related site? For nostalgia. Android was created to free the masses from mobile prison and Google has already freed millions from Microsoft’s Alcatraz Mobile. Regardless of what Windows Mobile 7 brings, most of us will never return to what will now be called a “Windows Phone”.

Nostalgia. Because when all is said and done, this may be the very last time you purchase a Microsoft operating system. Heck… it might be the last time you purchase ANY operating system because with the help of Google, we’re living in a free world. This time next year you’ll be shopping for your first Chrome OS Netbook/Laptop running Chrome browser with both Google Apps and Android Apps.

Take a deep breath. Breathe in. Breathe out. Remember all the good times you had with Microsoft Windows along the years…

The floppy disks. The hard disks. The gorilla banana throwing game in QBASIC. The blue screens of death. The free Compuserve and AOL trials. The conversations you had under fake aliases with Compuserve and AOL free trials. The first CD-ROM drive you ever had. The first time you burned a Mix CD. The beginning of your music pirating obsession. The long walks on the beach. More blue screens of death. Number munchers. Word munchers. Oregon Trail. MS-DOS. Buffer overflows. Computer worms. Viruses. CRASH!

*sigh*

In all fairness I’ve had a decent run with Windows. I’ve never wanted a Mac and to be honest – I think they’re overrated. Go ahead Apple evangelists, skewer me in the comments. Linux and Ubuntu faithfuls, I know I’ll hear from you too. Microsoft Windows has been a real pain in the ass from time to time but for the most part… and I use that phrase loosely… Windows has treated me well.

punt-windows-7But innovation is stagnant. Microsoft is complacent with having a death grip on Market Share and worrying about little else. Tisk tisk. Android has totally disrupted the mobile ecosystem, forcing a shift in how companies and consumers approach and perceive the market. Ane the loser? Windows Mobile.

I have a feeling Chrome OS will be to the desktop what Android is to mobile. I know Chrome Browser hasn’t taken off like Google hoped… or Google Apps, to be honest… but Chrome OS will be a bit different. Because now Google has Android. Android, Chrome and all of Google’s product overlap in ways that Google will be able to leverage like never before. Timing is everything and right now it seems like Google is carefully composing a software/services orchestra that they know, if they are patient, will become the ultimate masterpiece.

Don’t get me wrong, I AM going to buy Windows 7. Partially for Nostalgia – I think this is the last version of Windows I’ll ever purchase. But mostly because Chrome OS won’t be launching for another year and if I use Vista much longer than I feel forced to, there is a 50% chance I’ll punt my motherboard off a ferris wheel. And yeah, I’m waiting eagerly for Chrome OS… but I’m REALLY waiting to see what Google does to integrate Android and Chrome OS together.

But for the next 10-12 months… Windows 7 it is.

[Buy Windows 7 from Amazon]




  • Herman

    I’m not sure Chrome OS will be as spectacular as you think.

    Android is pretty cool but the changes aren’t ass mindblowing as you suggest. Most people use a Nokia or Samsung that aren’t even smartphones. I know 1 person with an Android.

    IF Windows Mobile 7 comes out next year, there’s agood chance the year after that the marketshares on Mobilephone OS-es will have changed dramatically, because ditching a phone is pretty easy. It’s at least more likely to happen on that platform than on the Desktops.

    Ditching Windows is not as easy as ditching a Windows Phone. What are my alternatives? Either Linux or a Mac. Linux doesn’t work for me, I’ve really tried, and a Mac is way too expensive for me. Ditching Android in three years when I buy a new phone is easy. Windows Mobile will do the same, and perhaps the iPhone is even better by then.

    I think Chrome OS’s impact will be extremely limited.

  • Johanove

    your not alone..

  • http://blog.cone.be Gert

    hm. Im a bit disappointed at the Windows plug. Although thats probably because I gave up on the Windows years ago..
    Anyway good luck with the 7.

  • Rob Jackson

    I wouldn’t really call it a plug. Did you read the article? I basically crapped on Windows 7 and said I’ll buy it because Vista has forced me to… I want ChromeOS but I’ll endure another year of this garbage for the sake of simplicity/transitioning.

  • Jonathan

    I was LETHAL on the Trail. Those Bison never saw what was coming.

  • Steve-O

    Personally, I’ll keep Windows 7 until something better comes along. I’ve had no problems with it whatsoever. Until someone makes a smarter, and I emphasize SMARTER OS, I’m sticking with Windows. Google is going to have their work cut out for them when it comes to drivers, peripherals and the grunt work that makes a good OS. A good OS in my mind isn’t just flash and bouncy graphical windows (MAC), it is a functional and intelligent piece of software.

  • Lloyd

    I hope this is a joke post.
    Are you recommending Windows 7 with out even trying it out ? ( how much are these guys paying you / YES / I consider this article as a plug )

    I would not recommend upgrading to Windows 7 even if you are stuck with XP heck even Windows 2000.

    You will have all previous issues with the newer version and on top of that it will be slow.

    Yeah macs are overrated and overpriced ( its regular intel hardware and made in China )

    I would suggest Ubuntu for almost 90% of the desktops out there. But thats just me.

    If you want to continue to fight with your computer keep riding the MS bandwagon till frustration.

    If Nostalgia is your reason for purchasing Windows 7 the integrity of phandroid.com is seriously at risk.

    .peace

  • Russell

    I think you are heavily underestimating the work involved in creating a new OS. A small, cut down, OS version that runs on a relatively small number of mobile devices is one thing. Creating a desktop ‘windows killer’ is quite something else. Windows has its issues, as do Linux and MacOS, but it’s still highly accomplished. I’m sure google will eventually come out with an OS capable of replacing windows if they use an already existing codebase like linux as a starting point but I doubt many people will be running it any time soon.

  • http://www.daverea.com medicdave

    Hrmm…why pay money (in this case, quite a lot of it) for the next-in-line product from a company with a track record like the one you so amusingly enumerated?! If you dislike Vista, there are plenty of alternatives. I’ve run Linux successfully for the last 5+ years, and Windows XP still runs reliably for me (albeit in a virtual machine). Contrary to Steve-O’s opinion, I believe a “good OS” is one that is as non-disruptive to your computing experience as possible. It should stay out of the way. While Linux may disrupt the minority of users on install (getting quirky hardware working, etc.) you will not hear a peep out of it for years thereafter. I doubt we can expect such quiet faithful obedience-to-the-user from Windows 7.

  • Rob Jackson

    @LLoyd – I would recommend it to Vista users. I actually don’t mind XP.

    @Medicdave – why not Linux/Ubuntu? The same reason it took Android to get the masses aboard on a Linux based mobile OS – familiarity and comfort level. I don’t have the time/desire to learn a new operating system and I’m pretty sure ChromeOS will seem natural out-of-the-box.

  • jason

    Most of us are locked into windows until chromeos or ubuntu or whatever up-and-comer can do 2 things:

    -dethrone office in the corporate universe
    -games

    Just about everything else is a snap… I like this spirit of this post, and it certainly looks like we’re on this path now more than ever before, but I think you’re about 3 years too early to be saying this…much less expecting it to happen.

  • Paul

    I think that the fundamental success of an OS is down to the software which runs on it. Case in point is Outlook – a superb piece of software which I, and most of the business world, use every day. Admittedly I use far more of the functionality within it than most people, but over the last 6 months, I have been trying to replicate the usage for the personal side of my life using Google Calendar and Tasks and Docs. Whilst the Google Apps have proven themselves to be ok-ish, the problems really come when you try to inter-operate between the Outlook and Google Apps.

    So, the web is full of problems relating to syncing between Outlook and Calendar, and different field formats for contacts between Outlook and Gmail.

    I don’t think people in offices around the world will adopt Chrome OS unless they can continue to use the same software seemlessly. And what are the chances that MS will program Outlook for Chrome?

    Despite Apple’s best efforts, I think most people also buy home computers on the basis of what they are used to, so the default choice for a home computer is still a Windows system.

    Therefore, whilst I can see Chrome grabbing a market share similar to Apple’s Mac OS has today, I can’t see it taking over from the dominance of MS Windows, which is too embedded in the office mindset today.

  • Steve-O

    @Paul – Great post.

    While Google is doing great work. A lot of the work is already done for them with Linux. People use Windows for business for a reason.

  • Jerry

    I woudn’t sing the praise of Chrome OS .. without even seeing what it’s all about.. but I’m sure whatever Google does, it’s going to be something to advance the industry … it’s going to be more about HTML 5 support .. Web apps and things that keep technology forward… Microsoft wants to stay in their comfort zone so they can keep their market share..

  • trent

    What a shameless plug! Whats wrong with you man? I can’t believe you are even proposing such a preposterous idea. Actually I’m just kidding. I don’t see why people are getting so defensive about this post. I’ve been using Windows 7 ever since the beta was released and I would have to say its served me pretty well. I watch blurays, video web chat, and play games on it. Anyways, this post was a fun read. Nostalgia indeed. Keep up the good work!

  • http://www.ticketwarehouse.com William

    You do realize that the Chrome OS is not a desktop operating system, correct? According to Google, the Chrome OS will be a browser-centered front end for cloud computing and netbooks, much like the Firefox-based operating system that is used by the CherryPal PC. Unless you only use your computer for basic GoogleApps, and no high level gaming or dealing with local files, it is unlikely you will be replacing your operating system with Chrome OS.

  • Bruce

    Know why I use Windows and will for the next 10+ years? Because I work for a fortune 500 company! C’mon folks, step down from your ivory towers. Windows is known and accepted by corporate IT staff and their users. Business and productivity software is developed for it and just runs. They know how to network the PCs to the routers, firewalls, exchange servers, etc. Chrome OS will be to Windows what Bing is to Google search. They are going to have to come out swinging and HOPE they get 8-9% market share, then hope again that they can get a groundswell of corporate support after that. Of course if it is free it will be very compelling, but it will have to clear risk & compliance hurdles (sarbanes-oxley, SAS-70, etc.) before picking up share.

  • Mark

    Well, I enjoyed the post Rob, mainly because it follows my experience/thoughts exactly.

    As a kid I used to spend hundreds of hours tinkering around with my A1200 (Commodore Amiga) which had an OS light years ahead of all other personal computers out there. But at some point I realised that most of the tinkering was just wasting my time and what I really wanted was something that (like medicdave said) just allowed me to do what I really wanted to do.

    And although Windows would seem like the very last OS you would choose for that reason, its the one I went with. Simply because its the OS that the vast majority use, so has the most software, drivers and best support etc.

    Suppose I come across a tool on the web. I download it, its great. I mention it to my Mac friend and he’s asking if there’s a Mac version. In general, this is a type of question a Windows user doesn’t need to ask.

    Basically, sticking to the mainstream brings safety in numbers.

    I have no doubt that Windows is by far the worst OS out there, but I have a strong suspicion that using it has made my life a little bit easier.

  • aerimus

    @lloyd and others

    I have hated microsoft for a long time. I’ve been a mac/open source guy for about 10 years now. I have to say though, when I built my last computer in may, I decided to put Windows 7 on it(free and what the heck). I have been shocked by how much I enjoy it. You really shouldn’t knock it until you try it. All these comments you guys are making remind me of the windows users(me included), talking about how stupid the mac os was about 10 years ago.

    I certainly would still prefer a mac, but I just can’t afford them right now for what I can build a pc for. Windows 7 is leaps and bounds better than any other windows product I’ve used. Hopefully a Chrome 0S BETA will come out before i’m forced to purchase windows 7 in march when the RC runs out though :-)

    All in all, windows 7 is quite nice in comparison to past iterations, and it should at least be looked at objectively.

  • Johan

    @Lloyd “You will have all previous issues with the newer version and on top of that it will be slow.” worst line ever.. have YOU ever tried win7? It’s crazy fast, especially compared to Vista… and it’s even faster than XP for the most part.

    People like you, who judge performance based on personal beleifs, fail.

  • Herman

    In real life Windows XP, Vista and in the future 7, work perfectly for most people. I’m talking 90% or more.

    They aren’t perfect, but neither are any of the other OS-es.

    They work for most people without problems, even Vista.

    I can’t believe some people still act like Windows is the worst that could happen to anyone.

    It’s like saying Megan Fox is an ugly, hidious bitch because you prefer Elisha Cuthbert.

  • johnkzin

    Skipping past the windows vs mac vs linux holy war … I’m going to focus on what you’ve mentioned about Chrome.

    IMO, Chrome isn’t going to work as a netbook OS, as it is currently billed/envisioned. Sure, the UI will be better suited for netbooks than Android. Scaling Android up to a 9-12″ screen is pushing its limits. But, Android has something that a web-browser only OS doesn’t: true off-line applications. Not just “Google Gears”, but locally running apps that don’t need an active internet connection in order to run.

    Unless Chrome has something like Dalvik (and why would they pick a different runtime than Dalvik? they already own it, and it doesn’t makes sense for them to undermine their own product),then they’re going to basically be making non-3G netbooks into door-stops. And, not everyone wants a 3G netbook.

    What I’m hoping for with Chrome (though I see no indication that I’ll get it):
    1) Instant-on/Splashtop type start-up speeds … and possibly the ability to hand-off to a conventional OS (in case you want to switch over to Ubuntu, or something).
    2) Support for Dalvik apps, and the Android marketplace (which means Dalvik will need to be modified to better support netbook resolutions, like 1024×600).
    3) support for Convertible Tablet Netbooks (like the EeePC T series, the Gigabyte convertibles, etc.). Ideally, Chrome would also support mid-range tablets (7-10″ tablets, like the Archos 9, etc.). That would include screen rotation (automatic or manual) and touch-screen support.

    Really, the best implemention for Chrome might be to just optimize Android for netbooks — dramatically improve start-up time, support bigger resolutions, include the Chrome desktop browser with full Ajax and Flash support instead of the Android mobile browser, and customize the UI for displays in the 1024×600 neighborhood of resolutions. But I doubt that’s what they’re going to do.

    I’d also want to see a Pro version that at least adds a local terminal to a “me” accound, and supported adding generic command-line linux apps (via apt-get or rpm … with my bias being toward debian apt-get). But a better Pro version might be to have a set of packages for the Chrome environment (browser, dalvik, touch screen/screen rotation support, etc.) that can be added on to other Linux distributions. Especially Ubuntu, Moblin, Linpus, and Xandros. That way you get the best of both worlds — the user oriented Chrome stuff, and the “Pro” Linux/X environment.

    Being able to Instant-on to Chrome-lite, and then have that hand-off to Chrome-Pro (running on top of Ubuntu), if I decide I need to run more conventional Linux apps, would be VERY interesting to me. Probably the best possible netbook/tablet environment.

    As a bonus, this type of “Chrome Pro” that runs on top of conventional OSes could also be adapted to run on top of Windows and Mac OS X, so that you could use the “Chrome-lite” as your instant-on OS, and then hand off to Windows or Mac OS when you want/need to move up to conventional apps.

  • http://www.moneydayz.com Fred

    Looks like another vista. Most of the visual effects have been done long ago in Linux with compiz. Too bad Micro$oft doesn’t focus on getting the system more secure and stop selling this virus/malware magnet. I’m not impressed…

  • Herman

    Fred obviously hasn’t tried it.

    Come on Fred, comments like that are really getting old. You’re living in a cave, Windows has improved dramatically.

    If you keep yelling random stuff like “It’s been done before” and “it’s not secure” and “micro$oft” people are going to think you’re stuck in 2000.

    Windows 7 is probalby more secure than OSX, but we won’t find out unless the marketshares switch and OSX is the one who has to deal with all the crapware.

  • Morten

    Windows 7 is the only good windows version to date. And I only use Windows to play games.

    The OS actually works, unlike 3.11, 95, 98, 2000, XP and Vista. I know many of you praise XP, but then you don’t have a clue what other OS’s can offer. W7 is the only one that brings a similar experience that other OS’s has had for years and years. Finally I dont have to suffer any longer.

  • Melissa

    Just as a side note, reminder to all college students that Windows 7 can be purchased from win741.com for $30 (+$6 for them to save a copy) if you have a .edu email until January 3(?). I’m going to be purchasing it for our gaming/media desktop b/c my husband is tired of not having access to his bluetooth headset and the quad core processor.

  • Phil

    I don’t think Chrome OS will catch on faster than Moblin based Linux distros. I’m looking for Moblin to be a pretty big breakthrough.

  • Morten

    Phil: Googles PR > Random distro PR

    Yes?

  • Herman

    Morten has a point.

    I havan’t even heard of Moblin.

    Most people I know don’t even know what Ubuntu is.

  • http://dak4.com/ Kearns

    Irregardless of the pro Microsoft vs. anti Microsoft thread above, I believe you mean gouge your eyes, not gauge you eyes…

  • Kate

    Yes, like johnkzin and William pointed out, I don’t think Chrome OS will be a replacement operating system. Google said it themselves… it would be entirely web-centric; it might be fun for teenagers and the like, but for people who need serious applications for development and communication (such as Photoshop, ftp clients, file editors, mail clients), as well as games, I can’t see it being any good.

    Unless Google expands Chrome OS beyond an exaggerated browser, I don’t see how much good it’ll do. I wouldn’t use it if I had to switch between ChromeOS/Windows/MacOS.

  • Colin

    If only Windows 7 had come along 2 years ago, I may not have gotten so sick of Vista that I banished it from my desktop. I now Ubunutu with a WinXP LiveBox for those pesky Windows-only needs that crop up once in a while.

  • Mark

    Does anyone know if Chrome OS will support/feature some kind of single sign on functionality?

    Open netbook up. Instant start. Enter password to unlock screen and then you are automatically logged in (in a similar way to OpenID) to all supporting websites as you visit – which hopefully eventually/soon will be ALL websites :)

    Now THAT would be nice.

  • Morten

    I dont think we know anything about Chrome OS. Though I bet it will be fully usable offline with all google apps and much other impressive new stuff.

  • http://www.garysimon.net Gary

    Those of you ripping on Windows, you can’t knock the fact that it runs every game + every development app. Any other OS out there has issues with some aspects/software of each of those industries. For that fact alone, I’m sticking with windows.

  • veggie monkey

    You saw this post coming: I’ve watched the Windows 7 demos. It looks like it’s almost caught up with Ubuntu. I switched from XP to Ubuntu a couple months ago when I realized there was no good Windows upgrade path. It was scary at first, but ultimately liberating, much like divorcing my first wife but with far greater cost savings. Windows 7 Ultimate: $319.99. Ubuntu: Free. If you’re a “user” I can understand the desire to stick with Windows (or Mac). But if you’re a self-respecting nerd, you are bringing shame upon yourself and your ancestors if you don’t make the switch.

  • veggie monkey

    @Gary: I’m running all my Windows games just fine in Ubuntu. But I’m slowly dropping them all and replacing them with free equivalent games, most of which are cross-platform. But you go ahead and hang on to your security blanket, since it clearly has no history of “issues”.

  • Terran

    LOL flame wars :) They just cant be stopped. Well for the sake of being like everyone else, I’ll post an opinionated comment. I’m really not excited at all for Chrome. I love what android has done (since i see it as more of something to compete with the iPhone.) It not perfect by any means or revolutionary in an extreme sense. It’s just something new from the limits we have had before. As far as computer OS’s go. I have Windows 7 coming in the mail in the next few days FOR FREE, since I just bought my laptop a few months ago. I have had VERY little problems with Vista and don’t see why everyone has such a hate for it. Yes, its MS. Yes, it’s not a pretty as OSX. and it is mostlikely not as good as linux if you know a lot about programing or computers in itself. BUT, for the common day user it will feel right at home. Its familiar, reliable for the most part, easy to use for basic functions. I’m happy with Windows, and I’d be happy with OSX or Linux too. They are all great functioning OS’s all aimed at different crowds. It’s easy to forget on sites like this though that it is only the techy geek scene who check this and other tech sites. And because its the techy geek scene, they all feel the need to argue about which OS is better when it doesn’t matter if one OS starts 2 seconds faster, or any other reason to fight about it. As long as it gets the job done then then you should be happy. well, there is my rant opinion. NOW STFU ABOUT WHICH OS IS BETTER AND TALK ABOUT ANDROID!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • Eric

    I completely skipped Vista.. I never felt the need for it. XP runs better on my machine and did most of the stuff I needed. Most of the time I boot my machine into Ubuntu though. It’s an excellent OS. I only really use Windows when I ‘have to’: Games, running PlayOn to relay Hulu etc to my Xbox 360. Windows really is in trouble though… I wonder how many more releases we will see? This could be the last one for a while… or ever?

    I don’t see why Chrome hasn’t caught on more. That is basically all I use when I’m in XP. It seems really fast and works great. For the rare occasion when it gives me issues I just open up Firefox. I completely uninstalled Internet Explorer because it was causing me all kinds of issues.

  • Perry

    I have been using windows 7 on my tablet pc and HTPC for a while now and like it, but have some caveats.

    First, it runs much better out of the box than it does a few months down the road with a full catalog of applications installed.

    Second, I am not a fan of the networking.

    Third, it is a memory hog. On my tablet pc (x200t) I am forced to run 32 bit (due to legacy driver support needs) and suck up the memory pretty regularly. On my desktop PC I run no pagefile – it makes things much faster and minimizes disk use. I can’t do that without constant memory errors in 7 on a 32 bit system. It noticably hurts battery time. On a loaded system, it’s no different (in most cases higher) than memory load in vista, even with all the shiny graphical stuff turned off.

    I guess I have been spoiled with the boot times in Ubuntu/LinuxMint, but a fully loaded 7 takes DAYS to boot, noticeably longer than XP Pro.

    Upsides to 7 – I love the new dock and Aero Peek. The tablet integration is much better than it was. I don’t use or care about multi-touch (it’s a gimmick as far as I am concerned and does nothing to increase productivity).

    Main reasons I use it over ubuntu most of the time is simply software related. I use Bluebeam PDF revu and onenote daily. I use GIMP on occasion, but it’s not up to the level of PS. Haven’t found anything that comes close to matching dreamweaver on linux (but given how often I am messing with web work, I haven’t looked hard).

    With PuTTy for shell/vi access and Code::Blocks/Eclipse available in windows I can fill shell/coding needs with minimal fuss. It’s not as nice as terminal and linux, but it’s close enough.

    I love ubuntu/linux in general, but they simply don’t have the software support yet. I would switch to it exclusively if it had everything I need. It’s a great system.

    Till then, I will be using windows 7. I am not as excited about Chrome as Rob is for the same reasons I don’t use ubuntu exclusively.

    Once my campus comp sci department offers it for free/close to free, I will get a license and do a fresh install to replace the build I have been using for a few months and see if it’s any better.

    I might try to install both the 32 and 64 bit on this system so I can use the 64 for daily tasks and switch to the 32 when I need to use legacy drivers.

  • http://twitter.com/eccehomo999 *d.*

    I’ve got a lovely bunch of coconuts! Sitting nice and neat, in a row! Big ones, small ones, ones as big as your head!

  • bray424

    I’ve been using Windows 7 RC as my main OS for the last 2 months and I love it, and this is coming from someone who gave up on Vista in about 4 hours. So many little changes here and there that make you wonder why they ever did it any other way, with performance comparable to XP.

    That being said, if Chrome OS is what I expect it to be (Linux + corporate polish, as in never having to see a command prompt), I will definitely be dual booting the two.

  • Siby

    “This time next year you’ll be shopping for your first Chrome OS Netbook/Laptop”

    that’s a big leap of faith don’t you think?

  • http://www.online-guitar-tuition.com/ The Guitar God

    I’m looking forward to a cheap student upgrade with 7. My Linux expert says this OS should actually be decent and reasonably lighter.

  • Pedro Rodriguez

    I doubt I will be giving away windows by next year. Windows is still the gaming OS (and will be for a while). So, until Chrome OS can become a gaming OS I will keep my Windows.

    Unless I can get enough money to buy a gaming PC. In which case I will get a Chrome OS Netbook for work.

  • Just saying

    The problem with the Windows is that it can hardly be blamed to be evolving. Well sure there is more a bit more eyecandy and it seems to be getting faster, but it’s user interface is still pretty much the same it has been the last 10 years. This becomes very obvious when you compare it to OSX and eg. Ubuntu, which both have brought new innovations to the UI such as virtual desktops or gestures.

    And it only “works” because you people know how to use it. One of my friends bought a laptop with Windows Vista and requires constantly my help when he has problems with it while I installed Ubuntu to one of my other friends laptop and she hasn’t even once asked my help. It just worked.

    And even tough I’m not quite sure that the Chrome will be a fully fletched OS as it’s mostly focused around the internet, at least it will bring something new and quite possible innovative to the table. That’s why I’m quite anxiously waiting it :)

  • http://facebook.com/myhappYness imran hussaini

    i guess im the only person here who likes and uses vista.. well the first time i used was i got my first laptop.. i was then shocked that vista sucks. but when sp1 was released everything was fine! infact i loved it and still am!

  • john

    Macs are the best. The Only problems that I know of is music format and syncing softwares.

    Does HTC Sync work on Snow Leopard?
    Can Android play itunes formatted music? If not not, how do I put my itunes music on an android phone and/or HTC Sense?

  • jjspierx

    I think it is way too soon to be jumping on the Chrome OS bandwagon, when really, we know nothing about it. I don’t think it is even intended to be a Windows replacement OS. Microsoft will dominate the corporate and gaming world for years to come, if only because developers have been coding for Windows for as many years as they have. Chrome isn’t suppose to be capable of serious 3D gaming (from my understanding) and corporate business packages aren’t going to suddenly switch to a new untest operating system. It will take YEARS before the Chrome OS can make a name for itself as stable, secure and fast enough operating system (whether or not it is as initial release) for developers to either make the switch or to support multiple OS’s for high-end business, security, networking and gaming applications. I’m not trying to downplay Chrome OS as having an important role, I just don’t think that is the role they are intending, I think there intentions are for low-end small netbooks, and devices which can browse the internet, use office applications, take notes, etc… This is fine for many computer users out there. However, many others will require much more than that from their computer and operating system.